May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Retinal Vascular Development in Canine Optic Nerve Hypoplasia and Aplasia: A Histologic Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R. R. Dubielzig
    Pathobiological Sciences, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
  • E. daSilva
    Pathobiological Sciences, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships R.R. Dubielzig, None; E. daSilva, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 2462. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      R. R. Dubielzig, E. daSilva; Retinal Vascular Development in Canine Optic Nerve Hypoplasia and Aplasia: A Histologic Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):2462.

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Abstract

Purpose:: Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) and aplasia (ONA) have been reported as rare developmental disorders in dogs. The purpose of the study is to document 10 cases of canine optic nerve hypoplasia and 5 cases of canine optic nerve aplasia and to describe the consequent abnormalities in retinal vessel development.

Methods:: Over 17,000 cases at the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) were searched for cases of optic nerve hypoplasia or aplasia with adequate histological samples to evaluate. Microscopic evaluation was performed tabulating the extent of retinal disease, optic nerve disease, and retinal vascular abnormalities.

Results:: Five cases of unilateral ONA and 10 cases of ONH were identified, 9 of which were bliateral. Shih tzus were the only breed with more than one case breed (5 0f 10 cases of ONH). All cases of ONA had retinas that were completely devoid of both ganglion cells and retinal blood vessels. These retinas did not touch the posterior poll of the globe. In the ONH cases, retinal blood vessels often failed to reach the peripheral retina, instead they left the retina and extended into the vitreous body leaving the peripheral retina avascular. Occasionally vestigial ruminants of optic nerve tissue were seen in peripheral nerve tissues in both groups.Five cases of unilateral ONA and 10 cases of ONH were identified, 9 of which were bliateral. Shih tzus were the only breed with more than one case breed (5 0f 10 cases of ONH). All cases of ONA had retinas that were completely devoid of both ganglion cells and retinal blood vessels. These retinas did not touch the posterior poll of the globe. In the ONH cases, retinal blood vessels often failed to reach the peripheral retina, instead they left the retina and extended into the vitreous body leaving the peripheral retina avascular. Occasionally vestigial ruminants of optic nerve tissue were seen in peripheral nerve tissues in both groups.

Conclusions:: Optic nerve hypoplasia and optic nerve aplasia are characterized histologically. Cases of hypoplasia have normal retinal blood vessels in the central retina but often these vessels turn inward into the vitreous in the periphery leaving the peripheral retina avasular whereas optic nerve aplasia is characterized by a complete absence of ganglion cells, blood vessels and the retina fails to make contact with the posterior poll.

Keywords: optic nerve • development • comparative anatomy 
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