May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Novel, Virus-Based Transsynaptic Tracers to Analyse Neural Circuits in the Retina
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • K. Balint
    Neurobiology, Friedrich Miescher Institute, Basel, Switzerland
    Institute of Biology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary
  • Z. Boldogkoi
    Institute of Biology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary
  • T. Viney
    Neurobiology, Friedrich Miescher Institute, Basel, Switzerland
  • B. Roska
    Neurobiology, Friedrich Miescher Institute, Basel, Switzerland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships K. Balint, None; Z. Boldogkoi, None; T. Viney, None; B. Roska, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support Novartis Research Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 2800. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      K. Balint, Z. Boldogkoi, T. Viney, B. Roska; Novel, Virus-Based Transsynaptic Tracers to Analyse Neural Circuits in the Retina. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):2800.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose:: To develop transsynaptic tracers with special abilities to analyze neural circuits in the visual system.

Methods:: We created a set of retrograde, transsynaptic, recombinant Pseudorabies virus (PRV) strains that express different fluorescent reporter proteins (FPs). These strains were injected into defined brain areas of the visual system. After 2-5 days the retina and the brain were isolated and the labeled cells were visualized with fluorescent microscopy.

Results:: The first group of PRVs contains four viruses, each expressing a membrane targeted FP with different color (Rainbow PRVs). The second group contains viruses that express two FPs with different colors at different times (Timer PRVs). PRVs in the third group express FPs that change fluorescence during neuronal activity (Activity monitor PRVs). 2-5 days after injecting a these PRVs into visual target areas, including the visual cortex and the superior colliculus we observed local ganglion cell circuits in the retina labeled with different FPs. A mixture of Rainbow PRVs at low titer was used to separate different ganglion cell circuits in the retina. Timer PRVs were used to differentiate between first and second order neurons. Activity monitor PRVs can be used to monitor activity in many neurons of a local circuit.

Conclusions:: Rainbow, Timer and Activity monitor PRVs are novel, retrograde transsynaptic tracers that can be used as tools to analyze local circuits in the retina and other visual areas.

Keywords: retinal connections, networks, circuitry 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×