May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Central Corneal Thickness (CCT) Decreases With Age
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • N. Lin
    Eye and Vision Central California, Fresno, California
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships N. Lin, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 4332. doi:
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      N. Lin; Central Corneal Thickness (CCT) Decreases With Age. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):4332.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: To evaluate the relationship between central corneal thickness (CCT) and age of patients in a general ophthalmology clinic.

Methods:: Total of 908 patients (mean age 34.8 yrs, range 6 mos - 90 yrs) attending a general ophthalmology clinic from April 2006 through October 2006 were included in the study. Patient population consisted of 64.1% Hispanic, 20.1% Caucasian, 12.3% Asian, and 3.5% African American; 45.7% was male and 54.3% female. Eyes with corneal diseases were excluded from the study. CCT was measured in 1813 eyes with ultrasound pachymeter (Pocket II, Quantel Medical SA, Bozeman, MT). Five readings were obtained, and the average was recorded. Unpaired T-tests were used to make the various comparisons. Correlation of mean CCT with different age groups was measured.

Results:: The mean CCT of all patients was 562.0 ± 42.6 µm. The difference between the left eye and right eye was not statistically significant (P = 0.657). CCT in males (564.5 ± 43.5 µm) was thicker than that (559.9 ± 43.1 µm) in females (P = 0.026). CCT in patients aged < 10 yrs was 578.7 ± 42.2 µm, 10-19 yrs 573.6 ± 40.9 µm, 20-29 yrs 560.1 ± 41.7 µm, 30 - 39 yrs 560.8 ± 43.5 µm, 40 - 49 yrs 553.9 ± 41.4 µm, 50 - 59 yrs 552.8 ± 36.7 µm, 60 - 69 yrs 544.1 ± 37.9 µm, and > 70 yrs 542.4 ± 36.7µm. The differences among age groups were significant (P<0.01) except in the groups between < 10 yrs and 10 -19 yrs; 20 - 29yrs and 30 -39 yrs; 20 - 29 yrs and 40 - 49 yrs; 20 - 29 yrs and 50 - 59 yrs; 30 - 39 yrs and 40 - 59 yrs; 30 - 39 yrs and 50 - 59 yrs; 40 - 49 yrs and 50 - 59 yrs; and 60 - 69 yrs and > 70yrs. CCT in patients aged < 40 yrs (572.3 ± 42.4 µm) was significantly thicker (P<0.00001) than that in patients aged > 40yrs (547.8 ± 38.5 µm). CCT was inversely correlated with age (r = -0.3187, P < 0.0001). The same findings were observed in both male (r = -0.3045, P < 0.0001) and female groups (r = -0.3011, P < 0.0001).

Conclusions:: CCT is inversely correlated with age. The CCT measurement is important in glaucoma assessment and management. Measuring CCT in patients older than 40 years is more important because older patients have thinner corneas. The findings have significant clinical implications in the diagnosis and management of glaucoma.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: risk factor assessment • aging • cornea: clinical science 
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