May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Primary Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy (PVR): Characteristics and Outcomes of a Large Patient Series From Colombia, South America
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J.-H. Sohn
    Ophth, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky
  • A. Abdala
    Ophth, Universidad del Norte, Baranquilla, Colombia
  • P. Rychwalski
    Ophth, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky
  • C. Abdala Caballero
    Ophth, Universidad del Norte, Baranquilla, Colombia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships J. Sohn, None; A. Abdala, None; P. Rychwalski, None; C. Abdala Caballero, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 5774. doi:
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      J.-H. Sohn, A. Abdala, P. Rychwalski, C. Abdala Caballero; Primary Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy (PVR): Characteristics and Outcomes of a Large Patient Series From Colombia, South America. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):5774.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: To report the characteristics of primary proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) in the North Coast of Colombia, South America and the anatomic and functional outcomes after treatment. Techniques and videos will be shown.

Methods:: Data were collected retrospectively from the medical records of 239 patients who presented with primary PVR between 2002-2006. A single surgeon (CA) performed all operations.

Results:: In 123/239 (51.4%) eyes, the retina had been detached for > 3 months. PVR-grade C was present in 44.3% eyes and PVR-grade D was present in 34.3% eyes. Eleven eyes (4.6%) had giant retinal tears at the time of presentation. 29/239 eyes (12.1%) had a history of ocular trauma. 14/239 (5.9%) eyes had high myopia. 197 patients (82.4%) were <20/200 at presentation. 158/239 eyes were operated upon and 94 of these patients have at least 6 months follow-up. The retina was successfully reattached with one operation in 145/158 (91.7%) cases. 13 eyes suffered a re-detachment; of these, 11 were successfully treated with one additional operation. The most frequent cause of primary failure was recurrent PVR. The final anatomic success rate in the 94 eyes observed for at least 6 months was 97.8%. In eyes with structural success, 60.7% achieved 20/200 vision or better but only 4.4% achieved visual acuity of 20/40 or better.

Conclusions:: This series represents a large series of patients with primary PVR. Despite late presentation and a complex array of pathology, surgical repair is frequently successful and often restores navigational vision.

Keywords: proliferative vitreoretinopathy 
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