May 2006
Volume 47, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2006
Infliximab for the Treatment of Refractory Ocular Inflammatory Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • L. Sobrin
    Uveitis, Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institute, Cambridge, MA
  • E.C. Kim
    Uveitis, University of California San Francisco, Proctor Foundation, San Francisco, CA
  • T. Papadaki
    Uveitis, Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institute, Cambridge, MA
  • E. Letko
    Uveitis, Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institute, Cambridge, MA
  • C.S. Foster
    Uveitis, Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institute, Cambridge, MA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  L. Sobrin, None; E.C. Kim, None; T. Papadaki, None; E. Letko, None; C.S. Foster, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2006, Vol.47, 589. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      L. Sobrin, E.C. Kim, T. Papadaki, E. Letko, C.S. Foster; Infliximab for the Treatment of Refractory Ocular Inflammatory Disease . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2006;47(13):589.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To report the outcomes of infliximab, an anti–tumor necrosis factor– α agent, in the treatment of patients with ocular inflammatory disease refractory to traditional immunomodulatory therapy (IMT).

Methods: : We reviewed the charts of twenty–four consecutive patients with noninfectious ocular inflammatory disease refractory to traditional IMT who were treated with infliximab 5 mg/kg, at 2–week to 8–week intervals, depending on severity of inflammation and response to treatment. Clinical response, including visual acuity and degree of inflammation, reduction in concomitant IMT, and adverse effects were assessed.

Results: : The mean follow–up was 23.7 months (range, 4 – 49 months). Eighteen patients experienced improvement in ocular inflammation after starting infliximab therapy. Five patients were able to decrease the dose of their concomitant IMT. Six patients were able to stop all other IMT. Two patients were able to remain inflammation–free off all medication. Visual acuity was stable in 17 of 24 patients, worse in 1 of 24 patients, and improved in 6 of 24 patients. Adverse effects of infusions included flushing and headache in two patients. A third patient developed a lupus–like reaction. The remaining 21 patients reported no adverse side effects due to infliximab use.

Conclusions: : Consistent with other recent studies, we found a high rate of efficacy of infliximab in controlling ocular inflammation. The incidence of adverse effects in this study was low with only one patient discontinuing the medication for medical reasons.

Keywords: uveitis-clinical/animal model • inflammation • immunomodulation/immunoregulation 
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