May 2006
Volume 47, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2006
Visual Skills And Reading Performance 1 Year After Visual Skills Training In Schools
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R.A. Hoffman
    Gemstone Foundation, Research Institute, Mission Viejo, CA
  • Y. Morita
    Gemstone Foundation, Research Institute, Mission Viejo, CA
  • G.L. Miner
    Gemstone Foundation, Research Institute, Mission Viejo, CA
  • M.K. Powers
    Gemstone Foundation, Research Institute, Mission Viejo, CA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  R.A. Hoffman, None; Y. Morita, None; G.L. Miner, None; M.K. Powers, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Ford Motor Company Foundation; College of Optometrists in Vision Development
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2006, Vol.47, 3144. doi:
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      R.A. Hoffman, Y. Morita, G.L. Miner, M.K. Powers; Visual Skills And Reading Performance 1 Year After Visual Skills Training In Schools . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2006;47(13):3144.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To determine the effects of visual skill training on (a) visual skill level and (b) reading performance 1 year following completion of a computerized visual skills training program.

Methods: : Students (age 12–19 yrs) who had participated in an internet–based visual skills program at school were re–tested on visual skills and reading fluency 11 months to 13 months following completion of the program. The program consisted of (a) assessment of visual skills and reading fluency, followed by (when indicated) (b) 30 sessions of 15 minutes practice on visual skills of tracking, accommodative facility, and fusion ranges. Intensive follow–up inquiries 1 year following the training program yielded data from 17 of 33 middle school students, 15 of 33 high school students, and 6 of 56 students in juvenile offender facilities. Visual skills (convergence and divergence ranges, accommodative facility, and saccadic tracking ability) were measured as well as reading fluency (1–minute standardized read–aloud test).

Results: : Visual skills declined for middle school students, on average, following the cessation of practice of visual skills at school. Nonetheless, at all school levels, reading fluency continued to improve.

Conclusions: : Long–term follow–up of visual skills training is important. Results obtained for one age/reading level may not be representative of all levels/ages. The present results suggest that gains may be made, but may not be permanent. Perhaps additional practice is indicated. Acknowledgments: Supported by grants from: Ford Motor Company; Delano Joint Union High School District; College of Optometrists in Vision Development.

Keywords: visual development 
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