May 2006
Volume 47, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2006
Reduced Central Foveal Thickness in Patients with Unexplained Visual Acuity Loss
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R.J. Brockhurst
    Berman–Gund Laboratory for the Study of Retinal Degenerations, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
  • M.A. Sandberg
    Berman–Gund Laboratory for the Study of Retinal Degenerations, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  R.J. Brockhurst, None; M.A. Sandberg, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Foundation Fighting Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2006, Vol.47, 3251. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      R.J. Brockhurst, M.A. Sandberg; Reduced Central Foveal Thickness in Patients with Unexplained Visual Acuity Loss . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2006;47(13):3251.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To determine whether decreased central retinal thickness occurs in some patients with reduced visual acuity and no diagnostic abnormalities in the macula by ophthalmoscopy.

Methods: : We evaluated 7 patients (ages 14–81 years) with visual acuity loss of 20/30 to 10/400 measured with a projected Snellen chart. All had a normal routine ocular examination, normal full–field electroretinograms (ERGs), and no systemic disease known to affect vision. We evaluated central retinal thickness with optical coherence tomography (OCT 3, Zeiss Meditec). We generally recorded from each eye six 6mm line scans in a radial spoke pattern through the central fovea. Each tomogram consisted of 512 A–scans with each A–scan comprising 1024 data points. We also recorded foveal cone ERGs with a hand–held stimulator ophthalmoscope (Doran Instruments).

Results: : All 7 patients had reduced central foveal thickness by OCT. Retinal thicknesses ranged from about 20% to 75% below normal. None of these patients had cystic changes, hole formation, or an epiretinal membrane. Five of the 7 had reduced foveal cone ERG amplitudes with or without delayed implicit times.

Conclusions: : OCT evaluation established that visual acuity reduction was due to loss of central foveal photoreceptors in these patients. OCT provides an added dimension to evaluate patients with visual acuity loss of unexplained etiology.

Keywords: visual acuity • macula/fovea • degenerations/dystrophies 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×