May 2006
Volume 47, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2006
A Comparison of Color Vision Tests in Control Subjects and Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • K. Holopigian
    Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY
  • J.M. Gallardo
    Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY
  • V.C. Greenstein
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, NY
  • D.H. Levinson
    Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY
  • J.I. Young
    Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY
  • W. Seiple
    Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  K. Holopigian, None; J.M. Gallardo, None; V.C. Greenstein, None; D.H. Levinson, None; J.I. Young, None; W. Seiple, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Foundation Fighting Blindness, NIH Grant EY02115
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2006, Vol.47, 3698. doi:
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      K. Holopigian, J.M. Gallardo, V.C. Greenstein, D.H. Levinson, J.I. Young, W. Seiple; A Comparison of Color Vision Tests in Control Subjects and Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2006;47(13):3698.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : The Roth 28 color arrangement test is gaining popularity as a replacement for the FM 100–hue test because it is less time consuming. However, there are few studies comparing these color vision tests in a clinical population. The current study compares the results of three color vision tests in control subjects and in patients with diabetic retinopathy.

Methods: : Ten patients with diabetic retinopathy were examined prior to photocoagulation therapy. Their results were compared to those for an age–similar control group. Color vision was tested monocularly using the Lanthony desaturated D15 test (D 15), the Roth 28–hue test (R 28) and the Farnsworth–Munsell 100–hue test (FM 100). Standard illuminant ‘C’ conditions with a Macbeth daylight illuminator (1200 lux) were used. The order of presentation of the color tests was randomized and there were no time restrictions. Error scores (square root), number of crossings and predominant axes were calculated. For the R 28 test, the error score calculation was adjusted for a continuous distribution to make it comparable to the FM 100 test. A Kinnear axis analysis was applied to the FM 100 data.

Results: : For the FM 100 test, the error scores for the control subjects were within the normal range and showed no significant axes. However, for both the D 15 and R 28 tests, some of the control subjects showed a tritan axis. For the patients with diabetic retinopathy, the number of crossings and error scores were similar across tests. However, there were discrepancies among the three tests in the detection of tritan axes and agreement among the three tests occurred in only 30% of the patients.

Conclusions: : The D15 and R 28 tests are more likely to show significant axes in control subjects than the FM 100 test. In addition, these tests do not show agreement in detecting significant axes in patients with diabetic retinopathy.

Keywords: color vision • diabetic retinopathy • retina 
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