May 2006
Volume 47, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2006
Preferred Retinal Locus and Visual Acuity in Eyes With Macular Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. Ishiko
    Ophthalmology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Japan
  • E. Sato
    Ophthalmology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Japan
  • H. Kagokawa
    Ophthalmology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Japan
  • J. Takahashi
    Ophthalmology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Japan
  • M. Takeda
    Ophthalmology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Japan
  • A. Takahashi
    Ophthalmology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Japan
  • Y. Kato
    Ophthalmology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Japan
  • A. Yoshida
    Ophthalmology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S. Ishiko, None; E. Sato, None; H. Kagokawa, None; J. Takahashi, None; M. Takeda, None; A. Takahashi, None; Y. Kato, None; A. Yoshida, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Suzuken Memorial Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2006, Vol.47, 5203. doi:
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      S. Ishiko, E. Sato, H. Kagokawa, J. Takahashi, M. Takeda, A. Takahashi, Y. Kato, A. Yoshida; Preferred Retinal Locus and Visual Acuity in Eyes With Macular Disease . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2006;47(13):5203.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Several reports have been published on the correlation between visual acuity (VA) and foveal thickness after macular surgery. However, because the preferred retinal locus (PRL) at the fovea often is affected in macular disease, the area with pathologic changes that is evaluated and the lesions that produce the VA changes might differ. To clarify the characteristics of the PRL in macular disease, we studied the relation between the PRL and the VA in eyes with several macular diseases.

Methods: : Of the 2,136 eyes that underwent a PRL evaluation using scanning laser ophthalmoscope microperimetry at Asahikawa Medical College from 1999 to 2005, the following were included: 51 eyes had a preretinal membrane (PRM); 56 highly myopic eyes, chorioretinal atrophy (HMC); 48 highly myopic eyes, no chorioretinal atrophy (HMN); 112 eyes, diabetic macular edema (DME); 52 eyes, branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO); and 156 eyes age–related macular degeneration (AMD). The PRLs were classified into 2 groups: a functioning PRL at the fovea and a PRL not at the fovea. We studied the relation between PRL and VA in each disease.

Results: : In most eyes with PRM and HMN, the PRLs were at the fovea regardless of the VA. In all eyes with DME and VA ≥0.3, the PRL was at the fovea, and in eyes with DME and VA <0.1, the PRL was not at the fovea in 76.9%. In eyes with HMC, BRVO, and AMD and VA <0.1, the PRL was not at the fovea in more than 90%, and the PRL in some eyes in these groups was not at the fovea despite VA ≥0.3.

Conclusions: : Depending on the macular disease, the PRL remained at the fovea or was easily moved from the fovea. Considering the characteristics of the PRL in each disease and evaluating the PRL are essential when studying the correlation between VA and pathologic foveal changes such as foveal thickness in eyes with macular disease.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: systems/equipment/techniques • macula/fovea • visual acuity 
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