May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Nanoceria Particles Confer Neuroprotection in Retinal Cells in vitro
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. Chen
    Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience (OCNS),
    Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
  • S. Seal
    Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center & Mechanical, Materials, Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL
  • S.A. Sezate
    Ophthalmology,
    Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
  • M. Ramsey
    Ophthalmology,
    Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
  • R. Elias
    Ophthalmology,
    Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
  • L. Wong
    Ophthalmology,
    Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
  • W. Cao
    Ophthalmology,
    Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
  • J.F. McGinnis
    Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience (OCNS),
    Ophthalmology,
    Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J. Chen, None; S. Seal, None; S.A. Sezate, None; M. Ramsey, None; R. Elias, None; L. Wong, None; W. Cao, None; J.F. McGinnis, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  P20 RR17703, EY014427, EY13050, EY12190 and Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 186. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      J. Chen, S. Seal, S.A. Sezate, M. Ramsey, R. Elias, L. Wong, W. Cao, J.F. McGinnis; Nanoceria Particles Confer Neuroprotection in Retinal Cells in vitro . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):186.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Nanoceria particles (CeO2) have been shown to promote longevity of cortical neurons. In this report, we tested whether these nanoparticles could protect retinal neurons from apoptosis induced by H2O2 in vitro. Methods: Primary retinal cell cultures of 0–2 day old rat pups were grown in defined medium for 10–14 days. Nanoceria particles were added to the cultures at different days prior to the challenge of 100 µM H2O2, an apoptotic agent. After 12 h, the cells were harvested and the degree of apoptosis was determined using flow cytometry to detect the Annexin V–FITC signals. Results: We showed that nanoparticles alone did not affect the health of retinal cells within our experimental time frame. The protection effect of the nanoparticles was concentration and time dependent. Among the concentrations of nanoparticles tested, 0.3nM, 1nM, 5nM, 10nM, and 20nM, the most dramatic protection was with 5nM. Incubation of nanoparticles with the cells for less than 24 h prior to H2O2 administration was insufficient to confer the protection. Conclusions: We demonstrated that nanoceria particles protect retinal neurons from cell death caused by reactive oxygen species generated by H2O2. Since these same reactive oxygen species may contribute to light induced photoreceptor cell death and/or other types of retinal degenerations, we think that these nanoparticles can be used as potential therapeutic treatments for protection of retinal neurons.

Keywords: cell death/apoptosis • photoreceptors • flow cytometry 
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