May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Increased Levels of Platelet–Derived Microparticles in Patients With Diabetic Retinopathy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • N. Ogata
    Ophthalmology,
    Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Japan
  • M. Imaizumi
    Ophthalmology,
    Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Japan
  • S. Nomura
    First Department of Internal Medicine,
    Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Japan
  • A. Shozu
    Third Department of Internal Medicine,
    Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Japan
  • M. Arichi
    Ophthalmology,
    Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Japan
  • M. Matsuoka
    Ophthalmology,
    Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Japan
  • M. Matsumura
    Ophthalmology,
    Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  N. Ogata, None; M. Imaizumi, None; S. Nomura, None; A. Shozu, None; M. Arichi, None; M. Matsuoka, None; M. Matsumura, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Grant–in Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education in Japan
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 407. doi:
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      N. Ogata, M. Imaizumi, S. Nomura, A. Shozu, M. Arichi, M. Matsuoka, M. Matsumura; Increased Levels of Platelet–Derived Microparticles in Patients With Diabetic Retinopathy . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):407.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Diabetic retinopathy is caused by capillary occlusions. Platelet–derived microparticles (PMPs), released from activated platelets, stimulate the coagulation cascade and increase leukocyte and endothelial cell adhesions, both of which are key events in the development of diabetic retinopathy. However, the correlation between the levels of PMPs and diabetic retinopathy has not been precisely determined. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the microangiopathic changes in the retina arise from the increased level of PMPs. Methods: Ninety–two type 2 diabetic patients were studied. The stage of diabetic retinopathy was determined by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography. The PMPs levels in the blood, and the levels of platelet activation markers (CD62P and CD63) were measured by flow cytometry. The level of HbA1c was determined by standard laboratory procedures. Results: The level of PMPs was significantly correlated with the expression of CD62P (r = 0.76, P<0.0001) and CD63 (r = 0.71, P<0.0001). The mean level of PMPs in diabetics (507 ± 15/104 platelets (plt), mean ± SE) was significantly higher than that in normal (263 ± 9 /104 plt). The PMPs levels increased with the progression of the diabetic retinopathy; 480 ± 28/104 plt in diabetic patients without retinopathy (n = 25), 504 ± 40/104 plt with mild or moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (n = 13), 512 ± 29/104 plt with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (n = 25), and 528 ± 25/104 plt with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (n = 29). The PMPs level in patients with non–perfused retinal areas (582 ± 27/104 plt, n =24) was significantly higher than patients without non–perfused areas (469 ± 23/104 plt, n =30, P =0.0096) and without diabetic retinopathy (P =0.024). The level of PMPs was significantly correlated with the level of HbA1c (r = 0.28, P = 0.011). Conclusions: There was a tendency for an increase in the PMPs levels according to the stage of diabetic retinopathy, and the significantly higher levels of PMPs were detected in diabetic retinopathy with non–perfused areas. This would suggest that the high levels of PMPs may accelerate the progression of diabetic retinopathy and may be a prognostic factor for the progression of diabetic retinopathy.

Keywords: diabetic retinopathy • diabetes • retinal neovascularization 
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