May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Recurrent Optic Disc Hemorrhage and the Progression of Glaucoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S. Kim
    Ophthalmology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • K. Park
    Ophthalmology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S. Kim, None; K. Park, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 2477. doi:
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      S. Kim, K. Park; Recurrent Optic Disc Hemorrhage and the Progression of Glaucoma . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):2477.

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To compare the clinical characteristics and the progression rate of glaucoma between the patients with recurrent and non–recurrent optic disc hemorrhages. Methods: The medical records of 57 eyes of 54 patients with optic disc hemorrhage were retrospectively reviewed. The patients had been followed up regularly with 1–3 months interval between 1991 and 2003 for more than 1 year after the first hemorrhage. Non–recurrent group was defined as having one episode of disc hemorrhage while recurrent group as having two or more episodes of hemorrhages. Mean follow–up period of non–recurrent group was 54.7 months while that of recurrent group was 67.5 months. Results: Twenty–six eyes (45.6%) showed recurrent and thirty–one eyes (54.4%) showed non–recurrent hemorrhages. Normal tension glaucoma was the most common type of glaucoma in both recurrent and non–recurrent group. Inferotemporal area was the most common location of disc hemorrhage in both groups. There were no differences in prevalence of associated systemic diseases between both groups. The cumulative probability of progression of optic disc change was significantly greater for patients with recurrent disc hemorrhages than for patients with non–recurrent disc hemorrhage (p=0.005, log rank test). However, no significant difference was found in the rate of progressive visual field defects in eyes with recurrent disc hemorrhages compared with eyes with non–recurrent disc hemorrhage (p=0.10, log rank test). Conclusions: Recurrent group showed greater probability of progressive change of optic disc than non–recurrent group although visual field change was not different between two groups. Further study must be made with a large number of patients and longer follow–up period.

Keywords: optic disc • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: risk factor assessment • visual fields 
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