May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Acanthamoeba Keratitis and Confocal Microscopy: New Horizons
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D.D. Freitas
    Ophthalmology, Fed Univ Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • E.M. Nakano
    Ophthalmology, Fed Univ Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • K. Nakano
    Ophthalmology, Excimer Laser Santa Cruz, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • M. Oliveira
    Ophthalmology, Excimer Laser Santa Cruz, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • W. Portellinha
    Ophthalmology, Excimer Laser Santa Cruz, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D.D. Freitas, None; E.M. Nakano, None; K. Nakano, None; M. Oliveira, None; W. Portellinha, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 2614. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      D.D. Freitas, E.M. Nakano, K. Nakano, M. Oliveira, W. Portellinha; Acanthamoeba Keratitis and Confocal Microscopy: New Horizons . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):2614.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Based on confocal microscopic images obtained with Nidek ConfoScan 2.0 System in corneas with clinical suspect of AK that had the diagnosis confirmed by either cytological and/or histological analysis, this study intends to establish an in vivo pattern of presentation and behavior of Acanthamoeba, once such pattern is lost in any diagnosis procedure which involves corneal scrapping. More over, authors venture on a encystment and excystment process proposal based on in vivo observations. Methods: Sixteen eyes with clinical diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis ( AK) underwent confocal microscopy evaluation. All procedures were performed by one single observer and images were analysed by several experts in the field. Statistical analyses were applied in the Results: Hyper –reflective round, double–walled structures, measuring from 10 to 30µm were observed in all cases of confirmed AK. In one case a rare amoeboid body was seen and believed to be an Acanthamoeba trophozoite. Images suggesting different stages of encystment and excystment of the trophozoite were seen. Conclusions: Acanthamoeba keratitis findings in confocal microscopy are not well established in literature, therefore this study may contribute for the enhancement of new features on this serious ocular infection.

Keywords: Acanthamoeba • microscopy: confocal/tunneling • keratitis 
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