May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
The Influence of Human Tears and Their Components on Adhesion of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • K.A. Robinson
    Ophthalmology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
  • E. Muckersie
    Ophthalmology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
  • J.V. Forrester
    Ophthalmology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  K.A. Robinson, None; E. Muckersie, None; J.V. Forrester, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 2809. doi:
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      K.A. Robinson, E. Muckersie, J.V. Forrester; The Influence of Human Tears and Their Components on Adhesion of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):2809.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Tears play an essential role in maintaining the conjunctival and corneal integrity by providing a tightly regulated, optimal extra cellular environment critical to its numerous functions which include microbial defence, wound healing and regulation of the inflammatory response. This study aims to investigate the effect of human tears and its components on the adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). Methods: A monodisperse population of PMNs, isolated from the whole blood of human volunteers, was added to cell culture petri dishes in a pre evaluated optimal concentration of 0.5x106 cells/ml. Varying doses of neat human tears were added to the dishes and incubated at 37oC for 30mins. The plates were then washed and adherent cells fixed and counted to calculate dose response curves. Secondly tear proteins, lactoferin, lysozyme, tear lipocalin, IgA and albumin were investigated in the same assay for their influence on PMN adhesion. Results: Tears markedly inhibited adhesion of PMNs at very low total protein concentration (< 2mg/ml). However the purified tear proteins investigated, were found not to be responsible for inhibition of the PMN adhesion. Conclusions: Human tears have a very powerful anti–adhesive effect on PMNs in vitro. This effect cannot be attributed to any of the major proteins found in the tear film. Further investigation of the minor proteins is merited to identify the components responsible for the inhibition of adhesion.

Keywords: cell adhesions/cell junctions • cornea: tears/tear film/dry eye 
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