May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Icon–Targeted Photodynamic Therapy for Treatment of Choroidal Neovascularization in a Laser–Induced Rat Model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • F. Lu
    Ophthal & Visual Sci, Yale Eye Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
    Ophthalmology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
  • Z. Hu
    Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • A. Garen
    Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • R.A. Adelman
    Ophthal & Visual Sci, Yale Eye Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  F. Lu, None; Z. Hu, None; A. Garen, None; R.A. Adelman, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Paterson Trust Grant Lions of Connecticut
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 3026. doi:
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      F. Lu, Z. Hu, A. Garen, R.A. Adelman; Icon–Targeted Photodynamic Therapy for Treatment of Choroidal Neovascularization in a Laser–Induced Rat Model . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):3026.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: The experiments are designed to study the efficacy of Icon–Targeted Photodynamic Therapy (ITPDT) of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in a rat model of macular degeneration. The Icon binds specifically to tissue factor, which is expressed on endothelial cells of the CNV but not of the normal vasculature. Methods: Multiple CNV lesions were induced by laser photocoagulation of the retina in both eyes of Norway–Brown rats. After 4 weeks, 6 rats received an intravitreal injection of verteporfin conjugated to the Icon protein, and 4 control rats received an intravitreal injection of free verteporfin. One hour later some of the lesions were irradiated with 690 nm laser light, while the other lesions were not irradiated. The lesions were examined by fluorescein angiography 1, 7 and 14 days later to assess the efficacy of ITPDT. A second ITPDT treatment was administered on day 15 to 5 of the lesions that showed leakage on day 14, and these lesions were examined by fluorescein angiography on day 22 and 29. Results: In the 16 CNV lesions of the control rats injected with free verteporfin, either with or without 690 nm laser irradiation, persistent leakage occurred for at least 14 days. In the 33 lesions of the rats treated once with ITPDT, leakage stopped by day 7 but started again by day 14. After a second ITPDT treatment of 5 lesions that had shown leakage on day 14, the leakage stopped within 7 days. Conclusions: A single treatment with ITPDT was efficacious in stopping laser–induced CNV leakage by day 7, but leakage started again by day 14. A second ITPDT treatment of these lesions stopped the leakage within 7 days. These results suggest that multiple ITPDT treatments could provide long–term efficacy for age–related macular degeneration.

Keywords: age-related macular degeneration • choroid: neovascularization • photodynamic therapy 
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