May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Effect of Topical Mitomycin C on Intraocular Pressure
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. Krishnan
    Glaucoma Service,
    Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, PA
  • J. Myers
    Glaucoma Service,
    Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, PA
  • C. Shields
    Oncology Service,
    Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, PA
  • J. Shields
    Oncology Service,
    Wills Eye Hospital, Philadelphia, PA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  C. Krishnan, None; J. Myers, None; C. Shields, None; J. Shields, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 3764. doi:
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      C. Krishnan, J. Myers, C. Shields, J. Shields; Effect of Topical Mitomycin C on Intraocular Pressure . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):3764.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Given the theoretical potential for mitomycin–C to be toxic to the ciliary body and reduce intraocular pressure, this study was designed to determine whether topical application of 0.04% mitomycin C causes a decrease in intraocular pressure Methods: Retrospective review of 20 patients treated by the Wills Eye Hospital Oncology Service with topical mitomycin–C 0.04% for conjunctival and corneal tumors. None of these patients had a history of glaucoma, and none were on topical glaucoma medications. The primary objective was to compare intraocular pressure before and after treatment with topical mitomycin–C and to determine whether the number of cycles of treatment was a factor in IOP changes. One cycle of treatment consisted of one week of mitomycin–C 0.04% four times daily for one week followed by one week without mitomycin–C. Only one eye was treated per patient; therefore, the fellow eye served as a control. Results: Mean baseline IOP in treated eyes was 16.3 +/– 1.9 mm Hg, while baseline IOP in untreated eyes was 16.5 +/– 2.2 mm Hg (statistically insignificant by paired t–test, p > 0.05). The three–month post–treatment averaged IOP was 16.3 +/– 3.3 mm Hg in the treated eye and 16.5 +/– 3.3 mm Hg in the untreated eye (statistically insignificant by paired t–test, p > 0.05). The difference in IOP between treated and untreated eyes showed no statistical difference (paired t–test, p >0.05) when compared before and after treatment. The number of treatment cycles showed no effect on intraocular pressure when comparing patients who underwent two cycles of treatment versus patients who underwent more than two cycles of treatment (independent t–test, p > 0.05). Overall, 7 patients ended up above their pre–treatment IOP baseline in the treated eye (mean 2.4 +/– 2.0 mm Hg), while 7 patients ended up below their pre–treatment baseline (–2.9 +/– 1.6 mm Hg). The other patients showed no change. Conclusions: Topical mitomycin–C showed no statistically significant acute effect on intraocular pressure in this small sample of patients. Further prospective studies should be conducted to determine whether there is a long–term effect of mitomycin–C on intraocular pressure and whether increased concentrations of topical mitomycin–C cause a decline in intraocular pressure.

Keywords: intraocular pressure • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: systems/equipment/techniques • inflow/ciliary body 
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