May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
10–Year Incidence of Cataract Surgery in an Older Population: The Blue Mountains Eye Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • E. Rochtchina
    Ophthalmology (Centre for Vision Research), University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
  • J.J. Wang
    Ophthalmology (Centre for Vision Research), University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
  • A. Tan
    Ophthalmology (Centre for Vision Research), University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
  • P. Mitchell
    Ophthalmology (Centre for Vision Research), University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
  • Blue Mountains Eye Study
    Ophthalmology (Centre for Vision Research), University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  E. Rochtchina, None; J.J. Wang, None; A. Tan, None; P. Mitchell, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Australian NHMRC Grant 211069
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 3836. doi:
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      E. Rochtchina, J.J. Wang, A. Tan, P. Mitchell, Blue Mountains Eye Study; 10–Year Incidence of Cataract Surgery in an Older Population: The Blue Mountains Eye Study . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):3836.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To describe the 10–year incidence of cataract surgery in an older population–based cohort. Methods: Survivors of 3654 participants of the Blue Mountains Eye Study (1992–4) were re–examined after 5years (1997–9) and 10years (2002–4). Reports of cataract surgery were obtained at both examinations, and the presence of aphakia or pseudophakia was confirmed in masked grading of lens photographs taken at each examination. Results: After excluding 1073 persons who died during the 10–year period, 1935 of 2581 (75.0 %) surviving baseline participants were re–examined during 2002–4. Of this group, 1832 were phakic in both eyes at baseline. The overall 10–year incidence of cataract surgery in first or both eyes was 16.3%, including 10.5% bilateral and 5.8% unilateral cases. Cataract surgery incidence was strongly age–related and increased from 5.1% in persons aged 50–59 years at baseline to 15.4% and 39.5% in those aged 60–69 and 70+ years, respectively. A further 24/ 31 unilaterally phakic subjects (73.3%) had second eye surgery. The incidence was significantly higher in women than men (19.2% vs12.1%, age–adjusted p<0.001). Less than a quarter (22.7%) of these surgical procedures occurred in the first 5 years with the remainder (77.3%) occurring between the 5– and 10–year examinations. In the multi–variable adjusted logistic regression model, baseline factors that remained significantly associated with incident cataract surgery were age (odds ratio, OR, per decade, 2.4, 95% confidence interval, CI, 2.0–3.0), female gender (OR 1.6, CI 1.2–2.1), presence of cataract (OR 3.3, CI 2.5–4.3), visual impairment (OR 1.9, CI 1.1–3.3) or myopia (OR 1.8, CI 1.2–2.6). No significant socio–economic predictors were found. Participants who underwent cataract surgery during the 10–year follow–up period were half as likely to have visual impairment at the 10–year examination (age–sex adjusted OR 0.53, CI 0.29–0.99). Conclusions: This population–based study confirms a very high age–related demand for cataract surgery. Our data suggest that, for current cataract surgery indications, around 40% of persons aged 70 years or older who have not had previous surgery could expect to need one or two cataract surgical procedures over the next 10 years. In this study, women had a greater risk of incident cataract surgery than men.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence • cataract 
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