May 2005
Volume 46, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2005
Immature Neural Retinal Cells Integrate and Differentiate Into Photoreceptors When Transplanted Into the Mouse Subreitnal Space at Post–natal Day 1
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R.E. MacLaren
    Division of Molecular Therapy, Institute of Ophthalmology,
    University College London, London, United Kingdom
  • A. MacNeil
    Division of Molecular Therapy, Institute of Ophthalmology,
    University College London, London, United Kingdom
  • R.A. Pearson
    Developmental Biology Unit, Institute of Child Health,
    University College London, London, United Kingdom
  • J.C. Sowden
    Developmental Biology Unit, Institute of Child Health,
    University College London, London, United Kingdom
  • R.R. Ali
    Division of Molecular Therapy, Institute of Ophthalmology,
    University College London, London, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  R.E. MacLaren, None; A. MacNeil, None; R.A. Pearson, None; J.C. Sowden, None; R.R. Ali, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Medical Research Council UK
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2005, Vol.46, 4153. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      R.E. MacLaren, A. MacNeil, R.A. Pearson, J.C. Sowden, R.R. Ali; Immature Neural Retinal Cells Integrate and Differentiate Into Photoreceptors When Transplanted Into the Mouse Subreitnal Space at Post–natal Day 1 . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2005;46(13):4153.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To determine the degree to which immature retinal cells can differentiate into photoreceptors when transplanted into the subretinal space at post–natal day 1 (P1) Methods: Cells from dissociated P1 neural retinas were obtained from mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and transplanted into wild–type litter mates at P1. Approximately 50 000 cells were injected into the subretinal space. Results: After three weeks, transplanted cells had integrated with the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of the neural retina. The majority of these GFP–expressing cells had the morphology of rod photoreceptors, showing a nucleus, spherules, inner and outer segments. Integration was significantly enhanced by retinal injury at the time of transplantation. Conclusions: Immature neural retinal cells can migrate and differentiate to form correctly orientated and anatomically integrated photoreceptors when transplanted into the P1 eye.

Keywords: retina • transplantation • photoreceptors 
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