May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Interleukin–1 (IL–1) and Interleukin–1 receptor antagonist (IL–1ra) in patients with uveitis.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • T. Zhao
    Hilles Immunology Laboratory,
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
  • M. Ahmed
    Ocular Immunology and Uveitis,
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
  • Y. El–Shabrawi
    Ocular Immunology and Uveitis,
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
  • W. Christen
    Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • S. Baltatzis
    Ophthalmology, Athens University, Athens, Greece
  • C.S. Foster
    Ocular Immunology and Uveitis,
    Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  T. Zhao, None; M. Ahmed, None; Y. El–Shabrawi, None; W. Christen, None; S. Baltatzis, None; C.S. Foster, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 559. doi:
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      T. Zhao, M. Ahmed, Y. El–Shabrawi, W. Christen, S. Baltatzis, C.S. Foster; Interleukin–1 (IL–1) and Interleukin–1 receptor antagonist (IL–1ra) in patients with uveitis. . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):559.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose:To investigate the role of interleukin–1ß (IL–1ß) and its naturally occurring antagonist interleukin–1 receptor antagonist (IL–1ra) in the pathogenesis of uveitis. Methods:IL–1ß and IL–1ra levels in aqueous humor and vitreous from 22 patients with uveitis were measured with specific enzyme linked immunoassays (ELISA). Aqueous humor from normal individuals undergoing cataract surgery served as control material. Results:Low levels of IL–1ß were detected in 8 of 10 patients with active uveitis, with higher levels in patients at early stages of their disease. In patients with acute active disease the amounts of IL–1ß found ranged from 5–9 pg/ml. IL–1ra was found in all uveitis patients and in the control group. IL–1ra levels in patients with active uveitis ranged from 0.3–17.9 ng/ml (median 1.5 ng/ml). Patients with acute uveitis presented with significantly higher intraocular IL–1ra levels (median 12.9 ng/ml) than did patients with chronic uveitis (median 1.8 ng/ml) (p<0.05). Conclusions:A greater than 1000 fold excess of IL–1ra over IL–1ß in patients with acute uveitis (who did not become chronic), versus only a 100 fold excess of IL–1ra in patients with chronic uveitis suggests that IL–1ra plays a role in down–regulating intraocular inflammation. The results of our study indicate that targeted anticytokine therapy using IL–1ra is an intuitive future treatment option in uveitis patients.

Keywords: inflammation 
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