May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Impact of unilateral and bilateral vision loss on mortality and quality of life
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • H.T. V. Vu
    Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, East Melbourne, Australia
  • J.E. Keeffe
    Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, East Melbourne, Australia
  • C.A. McCarty
    Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, WI
  • H.R. Taylor
    Centre for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, East Melbourne, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  H.T.V. Vu, None; J.E. Keeffe, None; C.A. McCarty, None; H.R. Taylor, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 1370. doi:
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      H.T. V. Vu, J.E. Keeffe, C.A. McCarty, H.R. Taylor; Impact of unilateral and bilateral vision loss on mortality and quality of life . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):1370.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose:To investigate whether bilateral or unilateral vision loss reduced any aspects of quality of life in comparison with normal vision. Methods: This study used a cluster stratified random sample of 3271 participants of the Melbourne Visual Impairment Project (VIP) from urban Victoria. The standard ophthalmic examination included measurement of best–corrected visual acuity (VA). Vision loss was defined as best–corrected VA of less than 6/12. VA and other predictors of outcomes were obtained from baseline examinations conducted between 1992 and 1994 while aspects of daily living and visual functions were obtained from the questionnaire of the follow–up survey conducted in 1997. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the risks of each outcome. Results: There were 231 deaths and 2594 attended the follow–up survey from the 3271 original participants. In comparison with normal vision, bilateral visual loss increased the risk of having problems reading the telephone book (OR 5.59; 95% CI, 1.84–17.0), newspaper (OR 10.3; 95% CI, 3.32–31.7), watching television (OR 15.4; 95% CI, 5.14–46.2), seeing faces (OR 25.3; 95% CI, 7.58–84.3) and doing other activities (OR 7.51; 95% CI, 2.37–23.8). On the other hand, unilateral vision loss increased the risk of falling away from home (OR 4.77; 95% CI, 1.91–11.9), having hip replacement surgery (OR 3.12; 95% CI, 1.23–7.91), using supplied meals (OR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.09–8.84), getting help with chores (OR 2.76; 95% CI, 1.18–6.43), dependency (using supplied meals and getting help with chores) (OR 7.17; 95% CI, 2.29–22.4), having problems reading newspaper (OR 2.11; 95% CI, 1.24–3.61) or seeing faces (OR 3.33; 95% CI, 1.34–8.26). Conclusions: Unilateral vision loss was associated with safe, mobility and dependence issues whereas bilateral vision loss was mainly associated with vision–related activities. People with either bilateral or unilateral uncorrectable vision loss may need assistance to overcome or cope with difficulties they will face in their daily activities. Safety, independence and mobility were also important issues for people with unilateral vision loss in addition to limitations in visual functions.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: biostatistics/epidemiology methodology 
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