May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Neuromyelitis Optica: Six Cases at the University of Washington
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R.C. J. Reinhardt
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • K. Mantei
    Pathology,
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • J. Zhang
    Pathology,
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • S. Hamilton
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • R. Mudumbai
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  R.C.J. Reinhardt, None; K. Mantei, None; J. Zhang, None; S. Hamilton, None; R. Mudumbai, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Supported in part by an unrestricted fund from RPB, NY, NY.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 1597. doi:
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      R.C. J. Reinhardt, K. Mantei, J. Zhang, S. Hamilton, R. Mudumbai; Neuromyelitis Optica: Six Cases at the University of Washington . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):1597.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To retrospectively review the vision characteristics of 11 eyes of six patients with Devic's Disease (DD) and identify potential prognostic factors. Methods: Retrospective chart review of six cases, representing 11 eyes, in addition to review of pathology slides of deceased patients with DD. A score was assigned to pre–treatment and post–treatment visual acuity, color vision, and visual field loss. The scores were compared for the 11 eyes in general, plus eyes with monophasic optic neuritis (ON) and eyes with relapsing ON in particular. Results: In general all eyes presented with severe vision loss, but eyes with monophasic ON had a better visual outcome than eyes with relapsing ON after treatment. Conclusions: Our patients were, in general, typical of DD patients with the exception that on average vision did not recover. Most patients had negative brain MRIs, abnormal spinal MRIs, CSF pleocytosis, severe vision loss and myelitis.

Keywords: neuro–ophthalmology: optic nerve • visual impairment: neuro–ophthalmological disease • neuro–ophthalmology: diagnosis 
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