May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Tracking Optic Radiation in the Living Human Brain with Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • T. Yamamoto
    Ophthalmology,
    Kyoto Prefectural Univ of Med, Kyoto, Japan
  • K. Yamada
    Radiology,
    Kyoto Prefectural Univ of Med, Kyoto, Japan
  • O. Hieda
    Ophthalmology,
    Kyoto Prefectural Univ of Med, Kyoto, Japan
  • T. Nishimura
    Radiology,
    Kyoto Prefectural Univ of Med, Kyoto, Japan
  • S. Kinoshita
    Ophthalmology,
    Kyoto Prefectural Univ of Med, Kyoto, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  T. Yamamoto, None; K. Yamada, None; O. Hieda, None; T. Nishimura, None; S. Kinoshita, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 2393. doi:
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      T. Yamamoto, K. Yamada, O. Hieda, T. Nishimura, S. Kinoshita; Tracking Optic Radiation in the Living Human Brain with Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):2393.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: The fiber–tracking method using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT–MRI) is currently the only noninvasive in vivo method for white matter fiber tracing in the human brain. This method computationally enables visualization of macroscopic 3–dimentional architectures of the neuronal projections by tracking the highly anisotropic water diffusion, using the general principle that brain water preferentially diffuses in the direction of white matter fibers as can be judged from the cytoarchitecture of the axon. We tried to visualize the optic radiation between lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and occipital lobes with this method and examined the feasibility of this method for clinical usage. Methods: DT–MRI scans for fiber tracking were obtained on a 32 year–old healthy man with a whole–body, 1.5 Tesla imager (Gyroscan Intera, Philips Medical Systems, The Netherlands). PRIDE software (Philips Medical Systems, The Netherlands) was used to calculate the diffusion tensor elements and anisotropy at each voxel, to create color–coded images and to translate the vectors into neuronal trajectories. We constructed fiber trajectories in the 3–dimentional space by tracking the direction of fastest diffusion from LGN, and then selected tracks based on anatomical knowledge of the optic radiation. Results: Neuronal projections between LGN and occipital lobe that were consistent with known anatomical locations of the optic radiation were clearly depicted in this case. The scans took 15 minutes, and preliminary images of optic radiation took approximately 20 minutes in this study. Conclusions: The fiber–tracking method using the DT–MRI enables the user to visualize the macroscopic 3–dimensional architecture of the optic radiation in vivo. These times for data acquisition and postprocessing are thought to be acceptable for clinical use.  

Keywords: clinical research methodology • computational modeling • imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) 
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