May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Non–invasive characterization and quantification of blood flow in eyes with retinal vein occlusion
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D.A. Nelson
    Optical Imaging, Ltd., Rehovot, Israel
  • S. Krupsky
    Goldschleger Eye Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel
  • M. Rosner
    Goldschleger Eye Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel
    Goldschleger Eye Research Institute, Tel Aviv University, Tel Hashomer, Israel
  • M. Belkin
    Goldschleger Eye Research Institute, Tel Aviv University, Tel Hashomer, Israel
  • A. Grinvald
    Optical Imaging, Ltd., Rehovot, Israel
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D.A. Nelson, Optical Imaging, Ltd. E, P; S. Krupsky, None; M. Rosner, None; M. Belkin, None; A. Grinvald, Optical Imaging, Ltd. I, E, P.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 2414. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      D.A. Nelson, S. Krupsky, M. Rosner, M. Belkin, A. Grinvald; Non–invasive characterization and quantification of blood flow in eyes with retinal vein occlusion . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):2414.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose:To non–invasively detect and quantify retinal blood flow–rate deficiencies and abnormalities in patients diagnosed with retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Methods:A Retinal Functional Imager (RFI) was used to acquire sets of 8 sequential retinal images at 55 Hz, under red–free flash illumination. RBC motion can be directly visualized from such sets, and flow velocity quantified from this motion. User selected vessel segment widths and flow velocities were measured using the RFI's operator–supervised automatic analysis algorithms. Vessel segments were measured in study and unaffected eyes. In eyes with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) vessels in the occluded area were evaluated. Segments were sub–categorized by diameter (0–25, 25–50, 50–75 µm). Results:Flow velocities were significantly lower for the affected vessel population (N= 6 eyes, 131 segments) than for size–matched vessels in control eyes (N= 3 eyes, 58 segments) (p < .001). The difference remained significant when RVO–affected vessels with stopping or retrograde blood flow were excluded from analysis (p < .01). Average ± Std. Dev. Flow Velocity (mm/sec) by Vessel Category 

*(stopping and retrograde vessels excluded) Blood flow impairment varied widely. In BRVO with shunting vessels, retrograde venous flow was seen in veins which would normally feed the blocked branch. BRVO without shunting vessels was accompanied by flow velocities in the occluded region that were at the low end of normal flow velocity ranges, and significantly lower than velocities measured in same eye–vessels in an unaffected quadrant (p < .05). In clinically severe CRVO, flow in veins stopped entirely, except during a portion of the heartbeat cycle, when it reached maximum values <0.3 mm/sec. Arterial flow switched direction at the same time. Less severe CRVO showed sustained flow, but at velocities below that in unaffected eyes (p < .01). Conclusions:The RFI enables quantifying and categorizing blood flow in eyes with RVO. Further studies are needed to identify parameters that will serve as prognostic factors.

Keywords: vascular occlusion/vascular occlusive disease • imaging/image analysis: clinical • imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) 
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