May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
High dose prednisolone does not alter optic nerve and choroidal blood flow in patients with acute optic neuritis and Graves’ ophthalmopathy.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • G.T. Dorner
    Clinical Pharmacology,
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
  • H. Resch
    Clinical Pharmacology,
    University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
  • G. Garhofer
    Clinical Pharmacology,
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
  • K. Kircher
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
  • A. Reitner
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
  • L. Schmetterer
    Clinical Pharmacology,
    University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  G.T. Dorner, None; H. Resch, None; G. Garhofer, None; K. Kircher, None; A. Reitner, None; L. Schmetterer, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 2614. doi:
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      G.T. Dorner, H. Resch, G. Garhofer, K. Kircher, A. Reitner, L. Schmetterer; High dose prednisolone does not alter optic nerve and choroidal blood flow in patients with acute optic neuritis and Graves’ ophthalmopathy. . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):2614.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: High dose prednisolone is a standard therapy in patients with acute optic neuritis and Graves’ ophthalmopathy. Interestingly, little information is available whether this treatment regimen is associated with alterations in ocular blood flow. Particularly in patients with acute optic neuritis a reduction in optic nerve head blood flow may be detrimental. Methods: Two patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy and 9 patients with optic neuritis were included in the present study. All patients underwent a standard prednisolone therapy of 1 g intravenously infused over 30 minutes on three consecutive days. Ocular hemodynamic parameters were measured on each study day before and immediately after cessation of the therapy. In patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy one eye was randomly selected, whereas the contralateral eye was measured in patients with acute optic neuritis. Optic nerve head blood (ONHBF) flow was measured with laser Doppler flowmetry. In addition, ocular fundus pulsation amplitude (FPA) was measured with laser interferometry to assess pulsatile choroidal blood flow. Results: Prednisolone did not alter ONHBF or FPA in the patients under study. On the first study day ONHBF was 8.5 ± 2.0 (a.u.) at baseline and 8.1 ± 1.7 (a.u.) after end of the infusion (p = 0.47). Ocular FPA was 4.1 ± 1.3 µm before and 4.0 ± 1.2 µm after administration of prednisolone (p = 0.51). Conclusions: The present study indicates that effects of high dose prednisolone on ocular blood flow are small. Hence, the therapy regimen as used in the present study appears to be safe with regard to ocular hemodynamic effects.

Keywords: blood supply • optic disc • choroid 
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