May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Chromatic Sensitivity Changes in Relation to Macular Pigment Optical Density (MPOD) in Human Vision
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Rodriguez–Carmona
    Applied Vision Research Centre, City University, London, United Kingdom
  • J.L. Barbur
    Applied Vision Research Centre, City University, London, United Kingdom
  • J.A. Harlow
    Applied Vision Research Centre, City University, London, United Kingdom
  • W. Schalch
    DSM Nutritional Products, Basel, Switzerland
  • W. Köpcke
    University of Münster, Münster, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M. Rodriguez–Carmona, None; J.L. Barbur, DSM Nutritional Products F; J.A. Harlow, None; W. Schalch, DSM Nutritional Products E; W. Köpcke, DSM Nutritional Products F.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 3438. doi:
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      M. Rodriguez–Carmona, J.L. Barbur, J.A. Harlow, W. Schalch, W. Köpcke; Chromatic Sensitivity Changes in Relation to Macular Pigment Optical Density (MPOD) in Human Vision . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):3438.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To assess how the variability of blue–yellow (BY) and red–green (RG) chromatic sensitivity, both foveally and in the paracentral visual field is affected by the MPOD–profile. Methods: Chromatic detection thresholds and MPOD–profiles were measured in 25 normal trichromats. In order to investigate the effect higher MPOD may have on chromatic sensitivity, some of the subjects (n=8) had been given 20mg of either LUT or ZEA (the constituents of MP), or 10mg LUT + 10mg ZEA (n=5) for 6 months. Chromatic detection thresholds were measured both foveally and 5° in the periphery using moving, colour–defined stimuli buried in dynamic luminance contrast noise. These stimulus conditions isolate the use of chromatic signals by masking the detection of any residual luminance contrast components in the moving test target. In this study we measured both BY and RG chromatic thresholds. In addition, we measured MPOD–profiles up to an eccentricity of ±8° using a new flicker nulling technique implemented on a high brightness CRT display. Results: A comparison of the MPOD–profiles reveals a substantial increase of MPOD in the supplemented groups (p = 0.005) with the greatest %increase in the parafoveal region. All subjects showed excellent RG chromatic sensitivity that was independent of MPOD. BY thresholds, on the other hand, were significantly larger in the fovea. When tested with ANOVA, the dependency of the BY foveal thresholds on supplementation was statistically significant (p<0.005). The parafoveal BY thresholds showed a similar trend, but the measured differences were no longer statistically significant. Conclusions: The results show that MPOD can be increased significantly by supplementation with LUT and ZEA. Variation in MPOD–profiles in the normal population may contribute to the increased variability in BY thresholds.

Keywords: color vision • macular pigment 
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