May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Sutureless amniotic membrane fixation with fibrin glue for ocular surface reconstruction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • P. Szurman
    Anterior segment surgery,
    University Eye Hospital, Tubingen, Germany
  • M. Warga
    Anterior segment surgery,
    University Eye Hospital, Tubingen, Germany
  • S. Grisanti
    Retinal surgery,
    University Eye Hospital, Tubingen, Germany
  • R.T. Kaczmarek
    Anterior segment surgery,
    University Eye Hospital, Tubingen, Germany
  • J.M. Rohrbach
    Anterior segment surgery,
    University Eye Hospital, Tubingen, Germany
  • K.U. Bartz–Schmidt
    Retinal surgery,
    University Eye Hospital, Tubingen, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  P. Szurman, None; M. Warga, None; S. Grisanti, None; R.T. Kaczmarek, None; J.M. Rohrbach, None; K.U. Bartz–Schmidt, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 3917. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      P. Szurman, M. Warga, S. Grisanti, R.T. Kaczmarek, J.M. Rohrbach, K.U. Bartz–Schmidt; Sutureless amniotic membrane fixation with fibrin glue for ocular surface reconstruction . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):3917.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To evaluate a new method for minimally invasive fixation of amnion membrane for ocular surface reconstruction. Methods: In a first step, the ideal concentration and ratio of fibrinogen and thrombin were determined. After preparation of human amniotic membrane discs using a 7 mm trephine, different dilutions of a commercially available fibrin glue (Tissue Col©) were tested to affix the specimen on porcine cadaver eyes. Fourteen different modes of application were investigated. The samples were evaluated for handling, manipulation time until cross–linking, adhesive properties and histological pattern. For in–vivo experiments, twelve pigmented rabbits were operated with amnion membrane transplantation divided into two groups. In six eyes, the amnion membrane was fixated using the fibrin glue technique, in the other six eyes the membrane was conventionally sutured with 10.0 nylon. The rabbits were sacrificed after one week and the eyes were processed for histology. Results: Convincing adhesive properties with a sufficient manipulation time of 60 s were achieved using a concentration of 100 mg/ml fibrinogen and 20 IE thrombin. A two–step technique using amnion membrane immersion in undiluted fibrin solution, mild cross–linking with 20 IE thrombin on the cornea and final curing with undiluted thrombin showed the best results. This technique was applied in rabbit eyes and disclosed a stable fixation during the follow–up time. Epithelialisation was complete after three days in both groups. Histology showed an attached and epithialised transplant. Conclusions: This two–step technique described allows for easy and sutureless corneal fixation of amniotic membrane with sufficient manipulation time and without shrinkage of the transplant.

Keywords: cornea: clinical science • transplantation • wound healing 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×