May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Telemedicine based Digital Widefield Retinal Imaging for Screening of Retinopathy of Prematurity: Present Status of the Regensburg Telemedicine Project
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • H.M. Elflein
    Pediatric Ophthalmology, University Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany
  • C. Brückner
    Pediatric Ophthalmology, University Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany
  • M.N. Preising
    Pediatric Ophthalmology, University Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany
  • E. Wegscheider
    Pediatric Ophthalmology, University Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany
  • B. Lorenz
    Pediatric Ophthalmology, University Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  H.M. Elflein, None; C. Brückner, None; M.N. Preising, None; E. Wegscheider, None; B. Lorenz, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 4057. doi:
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      H.M. Elflein, C. Brückner, M.N. Preising, E. Wegscheider, B. Lorenz; Telemedicine based Digital Widefield Retinal Imaging for Screening of Retinopathy of Prematurity: Present Status of the Regensburg Telemedicine Project . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):4057.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose:To present our 33–month follow–up experience with a digital widefield imaging system (RetCam 120) for screening of Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in a remote setting. Methods:In January 2001, digital wide–field cameras were installed in five Neonatal intensive care units in Eastern Bavaria. All prematures at risk were examined by the local ophthalmolgists with the RetCam 120, and retinal images were sent anonymized (via ISDN), as well as the pediatric data (via email or fax) to the Reading Center for evaluation. At the reading center images were evaluated by two ophthalmologists giving recommendations as to follow–up examinations. Treatment, if necessary was performed onsite or at the reading center. Results:At 33 months 499 preterm infants have been examined, 13 were treated. ROP was seen in 20% of the infants. Imaging of zone III (not requiring treatment according to international criteria) was not reliable under screening conditions. Experience with the ophthalmoscopic aspect is essential for correct detection of proliferative changes. None of the five widefield cameras showed any sign of wear. Changes in the medical staff (consulting ophthalmologists and pediatricians) during the project had a direct impact on image quality, data acquisition and data transfer. Despite these problems, all treatment–requiring stages (zone I disease, threshold disease in zone II) were identified reliably. Conclusions:We demonstrate the use of a wide–field digital imaging system to screen for serious ROP in a routine clinical telemedical environment with identification of all treatment–requiring cases.

Keywords: retinopathy of prematurity 
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