May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Chronic in vivo biocompatibility testing of materials used for visual prostheses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J.P. McAllister
    Neurological Surg,
    Wayne St Univ Sch Med, Detroit, MI
  • J. Li
    Neurological Surg,
    Wayne St Univ Sch Med, Detroit, MI
  • K. Deren
    Neurological Surg,
    Wayne St Univ Sch Med, Detroit, MI
  • P.G. Finlayson
    Neurological Surg,
    Wayne St Univ Sch Med, Detroit, MI
  • C. Jaboro
    Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne St Univ, Detroit, MI
  • G.A. Auner
    Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne St Univ, Detroit, MI
  • R. Baird
    Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne St Univ, Detroit, MI
  • A. Lagman
    Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne St Univ, Detroit, MI
  • R. Iezzi
    Ophthalmology,
    Wayne St Univ Sch Med, Detroit, MI
  • G.W. Abrams
    Ophthalmology,
    Wayne St Univ Sch Med, Detroit, MI
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J.P. McAllister, None; J. Li, None; K. Deren, None; P.G. Finlayson, None; C. Jaboro, None; G.A. Auner, None; R. Baird, None; A. Lagman, None; R. Iezzi, None; G.W. Abrams, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 4214. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      J.P. McAllister, J. Li, K. Deren, P.G. Finlayson, C. Jaboro, G.A. Auner, R. Baird, A. Lagman, R. Iezzi, G.W. Abrams; Chronic in vivo biocompatibility testing of materials used for visual prostheses . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):4214.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose:To comprehensively evaluate the short– and long–term biocompatibility of novel and traditional biomaterials that could be used in a neural prosthesis. Methods: Circular "wafers" (2.5 x 0.250mm) of aluminum nitride, sapphire, platinum, and Corning borosilicate glass were implanted onto the cortical surface of adult rats. The bone flap was replaced and animals allowed to survive 10, 28 or 90 days. Normal, sham–operated and mechanically–lesioned animals served as controls. Tissue underlying each implant was processed for light microscopy using Nissl staining, silver staining for degenerating axons and neurons, and immunohistochemistry for reactive astrocytes and microglia. Quantitative assessments for cellular damage and glial reactivity were performed using a 3–point rating scale. Results:No animals developed neurological symptoms or infections, and wafers did not migrate from the original implantatin site. Sham operations and implants of coverslip glass and sapphire did not show marked effects. In contrast, aluminum nitride caused significant axonal degeneration in the cortical laminae and subcortical white matter, and a slight astrocytic reaction in the same regions. These changes, as well as glial reactivity to coverslip glass, were also elevated compared to intact controls, and occurred within 10 days of implantation. Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that aluminum nitride, a possible semiconductor material for new devices, may not be compatible with neural tissue over protracted periods.

Keywords: trauma • cytology • microscopy: light/fluorescence/immunohistochemistry 
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