May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Visual Acuity in Prematurely Born Children with Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI).
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J.M. Le Moine
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA
  • J. Soul
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA
  • D.L. Mayer
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA
  • R.M. Hansen
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA
  • A.B. Fulton
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J.M. Le Moine, None; J. Soul, None; D.L. Mayer, None; R.M. Hansen, None; A.B. Fulton, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  EY10597
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 4302. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      J.M. Le Moine, J. Soul, D.L. Mayer, R.M. Hansen, A.B. Fulton; Visual Acuity in Prematurely Born Children with Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI). . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):4302.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose:Investigate acuity development in prematurely born children with cerebral visual impairment (CVI). Methods: Grating acuity was measured using sweep visual evoked potential (VEP) and Teller acuity card (TAC) preferential looking procedures. Twenty–one children born at gestational age 25 to 36 weeks (median 29 weeks) were tested. Each child presented with CVI behaviors and visual inattention unexplained by ophthalmic features. All had clinical and neuroimaging evidence of periventricular leukomalacia, post–hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, or hypoxic ischemic brain injury acquired in the antenatal or neonatal period. Age at test ranged from 6 months to 12 years with up to 8.5 years follow–up. Fourteen had at least three longitudinal acuity measures. Results: All children had measurable acuity. Nearly all acuities were below the lower limits of normal, but showed modest improvement with increasing age. Among those with three or more longitudinal measurements, eight showed significant improvement, four showed no change. In one patient with severe CVI, only VEP acuity improved. One patient’s acuity worsened due to retinal detachment as a sequel to ROP. Conclusions: Despite significant bilateral cerebral injury, acuity in nearly all of these preterm born children improved or was stable, but remained low.

Keywords: visual acuity • visual development: infancy and childhood • electrophysiology: clinical 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×