May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
The Influence of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy on Fibrovascular Ingrowth in the Irradiated Anophthalmic Socket
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • G.K. Berry
    Ophthalmology, Wilford Hall Med Ctr, Lackland AFB, TX
  • D.E. E. Holck
    Ophthalmology, Wilford Hall Med Ctr, Lackland AFB, TX
  • S. Blaydon
    Ophthalmology, Brooke Army Medical Center, Ft. Sam Houston, TX
  • S. Demartelaere
    Ophthalmology, Brooke Army Medical Center, Ft. Sam Houston, TX
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  G.K. Berry, None; D.E.E. Holck, None; S. Blaydon, None; S. Demartelaere, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 4708. doi:
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      G.K. Berry, D.E. E. Holck, S. Blaydon, S. Demartelaere; The Influence of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy on Fibrovascular Ingrowth in the Irradiated Anophthalmic Socket . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):4708.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To evaluate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HbO) on fibrovascular ingrowth into coralline hydroxyapatite implants after irradiation. Methods: Forty–eight New Zealand Albino (NZA) rabbits were divided into two groups. In the control group, 24 rabbits received 4Gy external beam irradiation to the right eye on five consecutive days. After six months of observation, these animals underwent implantation of a 12mm diameter coralline hydroxyapatite orbital implant. Six rabbits were then sacrificed at weekly intervals and orbital implants were removed for histological evaluation. In the experimental group, 24 rabbits underwent irradiation, observation and implantation using the same protocol. The experimental group also received 20 sessions of HbO therapy at 2.5 atmospheres for 90 minutes during the observation period and 10 sessions of HbO therapy during the immediate post–implantation period. Six rabbits in the experimental group were similarly sacrificed at weekly intervals and the implants removed for histologic evaluation. Two pathologists, masked to HbO and implant duration status, determined the amount of fibrovascular ingrowth into the implant using a systematic grading scale from 0 (no growth) to 3 (cells and scant collagen). Results:In the control group, the mean fibrovascular ingrowth into the implant was scored at 1.10 (range 0.95–1.26) at one week, 2.16 (range 1.65–2.14) at two weeks, 2.14 (range 2.00–2.27) at 3 weeks and 2.27 (range 1.91–2.47) at 4 weeks. In the experimental group, the mean fibrovascular ingrowth into the implant was 1.36 (range 0.90–1.71) at one week, 2.27 (range 1.80–2.46) at two weeks, 2.33 (range 1.88–2.59) at 3 weeks and 2.46 (range 2.38–2.57) at 4 weeks. There was no statistically significant difference between the control and treatment groups at any of the four–week endpoints. Conclusion: When used both before and after implantation, hyperbaric oxygen therapy does not appear to promote fibrovascular ingrowth into coralline hydroxyapatite implants in irradiated anophthalmic sockets using the New Zealand Albino Rabbit model.

Keywords: orbit • radiation therapy • pathobiology 
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