May 2004
Volume 45, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2004
Accuracy of ophthalmologists in predicting glaucoma from ocular hypertension based on the results of the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • S.L. Mansberger
    Devers Eye Institute, Portland, OR
  • G.A. Cioffi
    Devers Eye Institute, Portland, OR
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  S.L. Mansberger, None; G.A. Cioffi, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2004, Vol.45, 5565. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      S.L. Mansberger, G.A. Cioffi; Accuracy of ophthalmologists in predicting glaucoma from ocular hypertension based on the results of the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS) . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2004;45(13):5565.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Ophthalmologists should balance the probability of developing glaucoma with the risks of ocular hypotensive treatment before treating an ocular hypertensive patient. We investigated the ability of ophthalmologists to predict the probability of glaucoma from ocular hypertension based on the results of The Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS). Methods: Twenty–three ophthalmologists estimated the probability of glaucoma over the next 5 years in 5 ocular hypertensive patients after reviewing the results of the OHTS. All representative patients had a pattern standard deviation (PSD) of 1.9 and did not have diabetes mellitus. Patient #1 had an age of 60 years, intraocular pressure (IOP) of 24 mm Hg, cup to disc ratio (C/D) of 0.3, and corneal thickness of 540 microns. Patient #2 had an age of 72 years, IOP of 25 mm Hg, a C/D of 0.6, and a corneal thickness of 510 microns. Patient #3 had an age of 60 years, IOP of 28 mm Hg, a C/D of 0.1, and a corneal thickness of 600 microns. Patient #4 had an age of 60 years, IOP of 24 mm Hg, C/D of 0.5, and a corneal thickness of 490 microns. Patient #5 had an age of 60 years, IOP of 24 mm Hg, a C/D of 0.1, and a corneal thickness of 540 microns. We compared the ophthalmologist estimates to a risk calculator developed from the OHTS. Results: Ophthalmologists estimated the mean probability +/– SD of developing glaucoma over the next five years in Patient #1, Patient #2, Patient #3, patient #4, and patient #5 as 9.1% +/– 12.1 (range 0 to 50), 31.5% +/– 26.0 (range 1 to 100), 7.4% +/– 5.0 (range 0–20), 15.8% +/– 15.4 (range 0–50), and 6.5% +/– 8.1 (range 0 to 25), respectively. The risk calculator estimated a probability of glaucoma in these same patients of 6.9%, 33.1%, 2.6%, 23.5%, and 4.0%, respectively. Conclusions: Ophthalmologists estimate a wide range of probability of developing glaucoma from ocular hypertension. Ophthalmologists may under or over treat their patients based on this estimate. More exact methods of determining the probability of glaucoma from ocular hypertension are needed.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: risk factor assessment 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×