May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Intravitreal Injection of Novel Combretastatin Analog MV-5-40
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R. Ratnakaram
    Ophthalmology, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, United States
  • J. Fuselier
    Medicine, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, United States
  • Y. Bezerra
    Medicine, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, United States
  • H. Oner
    Medicine, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, United States
  • G.A. Peyman
    Medicine, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, United States
  • D.H. Coy
    Medicine, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  R. Ratnakaram, None; J. Fuselier, None; Y. Bezerra, None; H. Oner, None; G.A. Peyman, None; D.H. Coy, None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 574. doi:
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      R. Ratnakaram, J. Fuselier, Y. Bezerra, H. Oner, G.A. Peyman, D.H. Coy; Intravitreal Injection of Novel Combretastatin Analog MV-5-40 . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):574.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To evaluate the ocular toxicity of intravitreally administered combretastatin analog MV-5-40, a potent angiogenic inhibitor. Methods: Twenty-four New Zealand albino rabbits were divided into 6 groups of 4 animals. The animals were anesthetized and treated according to the ARVO resolution. Three animals in each group underwent intravitreal injection of combretastatin (in one eye only) in these concentrations: Group 1, 10 –5M; Group 2, 10 -6M; Group 3, 10 -7M; Group 4, 10-8M; Group 5, 10 –4M; and Group 6, 10 -3M. Controls (1 animal per group) were injected intravitreally with 0.17 ml of sterile water. All injections were made through the pars plana using a 25-gauge needle positioned behind the lens. An anterior chamber paracentesis was performed to reduce the intraocular pressure. All animals were examined before and after injection with indirect ophthalmoscopy and slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Baseline and postinjection electroretinography was performed. After 14 days’ follow up, the animals were euthanized and the eyes were enucleated. The eyes were fixed in 2% paraformaldehyde, 3% glutaraldehyde for 48 hours; the globes were cut and placed in phosphate buffer solution. Various concentrations of ethanol were used for tissue dehydration. For pre-infiltration, ethanol and Technovit 7100 were used and the eyes were infiltrated overnight using Technovit 7100. The tissue was embedded in methacrylate overnight and cut at 3 µm, then stained with 1% Toluidine blue. Results: Groups 5 and 6 (10-4M and 10-3M) developed cataract, vitreous reaction, and retinal necrosis; the retinal necrosis was more intense in Group 6. Electroretinography showed decreasing b-wave amplitude in Groups 5 and 6; the results were normal in the other groups. Histological examination showed areas of retinal necrosis and disorganization in Groups 5 and 6; Groups 1-4 demonstrated normal-appearing retina. Conclusions: Combretastatin analog MV-5-40 injected intravitreally appeared safe at dosages of 10-5M or less. All ocular structures were normal in eyes injected with a concentration of 10-5 M of combretastatin or less.

Keywords: choroid: neovascularization • retinal neovascularization 
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