May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Response of Perfused Trabecular Meshwork Cell Monolayers to Low Fluence Diode Laser Irradiation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • B.K. Rivera
    Ophthalmology and The Biomedical Engineering Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States
  • D. Grzybowski
    Ophthalmology and The Biomedical Engineering Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States
  • C. Roberts
    Ophthalmology and The Biomedical Engineering Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States
  • P. Weber
    Ophthalmology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  B.K. Rivera, None; D. Grzybowski, None; C. Roberts, None; P. Weber, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  The Ohio Lions Eye Research Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 1178. doi:
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      B.K. Rivera, D. Grzybowski, C. Roberts, P. Weber; Response of Perfused Trabecular Meshwork Cell Monolayers to Low Fluence Diode Laser Irradiation . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):1178.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To investigate the hydraulic conductivity (Lp) response of perfused human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cell monolayers to low fluence diode laser irradiation. Methods: 8 confluent HTM cell monolayers were perfused at a starting pressure of 5.0 mm Hg. Experimental monolayers were irradiated with a diode laser (λ = 810 nm) at a power of 1.2 W over 1.0 sec (2 monolayers) and 1.5 sec (2 monolayers) duration for fluence levels of 0.2857 J/cm2 and 0.4286 J/cm2, respectively. Fluence levels were selected based upon the results of a pilot experimental series in which a change in Lp was noted, and viability of the cells was preserved. Each irradiated monolayer was run simultaneously with a non-irradiated control monolayer under the same conditions. Irradiation took place following 15 minutes of steady state perfusion, after which perfusion and data collection continued for 45 minutes. Both monolayers were then tested to determine post-experimental viability. Results: Monolayers irradiated at a fluence of 0.4286 J/cm2 exhibited an increase in Lp, with an average change from pre-irradiation values of 0.257 ± 0.026 µl/min/mm Hg/cm2. Monolayers irradiated at a fluence of 0.2857 J/cm2 showed no increase in Lp, with an average change from pre-irradiation values of 0.001 ± 0.056 µl/min/mm Hg/cm2. Corresponding control monolayers exhibited an average change over the same time period of 0.005 ± 0.010 and 0.002 ± 0.003 µl/min/mm Hg/cm2, respectively. Both experimental and control monolayers proved to be viable following the procedures. Conclusions: These results indicate that it is possible to promote an increase in hydraulic conductivity in a perfused HTM cell monolayer model using direct, non-destructive diode laser energy in a low fluence regime. This provides evidence of a direct correlation between laser irradiation and an increase in flow facility across an isolated, intact HTM cell monolayer.

Keywords: trabecular meshwork • laser • outflow: trabecular meshwork 
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