May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
The Impact of Non-Visual Domains of Cognition on Visual Acuity Testing: The SEE Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A.T. Broman
    Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States
  • B. Munoz
    Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States
  • K.A. Turano
    Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States
  • G.S. Rubin
    Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
  • K. Bandeen-Roche
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States
  • S.K. West
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A.T. Broman, None; B. Munoz, None; K.A. Turano, None; G.S. Rubin, None; K. Bandeen-Roche, None; S.K. West, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH AG16294
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 789. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      A.T. Broman, B. Munoz, K.A. Turano, G.S. Rubin, K. Bandeen-Roche, S.K. West; The Impact of Non-Visual Domains of Cognition on Visual Acuity Testing: The SEE Study . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):789.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To determine the impact of various domains of cognition on measuring visual acuity and decline in acuity. Methods: A population-based sample of 1505 persons between the ages of 72-92 was enrolled in the third round of the Salisbury Eye Evaluation (SEE). Visual acuity was measured binocularly, using ETDRS charts, and the participant’s habitual distance correction. Three non-visually intensive tests of cognition were performed: the Brief Test of Attention (attention), Boston Naming Test (verbal fluency), and the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (learning and memory). A measure of depression was taken from the General Health Questionnaire, and diabetes was determined from a medical history questionnaire. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, race, and depression; diabetes, which could affect both vision and mental status, was also included in the models. Cross-sectional analyses were performed using multivariate linear models; longitudinal analyses were performed using logistic models predicting decline in acuity of one line or more. Results: Currently, 1025 participants have been enrolled in the fourth round of SEE, two years following Round 3. Cross-sectionally, higher scores in tests of attention (ß=–0.01, p<0.0001), verbal fluency (ß=–0.002, p=0.0004), and learning and memory (ß=–0.004, p=0.0008) were associated with better visual acuity. In a multivariate model including all three cognition measures, only better attention was significantly associated (ß=–0.006, p=0.03) with better acuity. Over the 2-year period, participants showed minimal change in cognition. Of the three cognition measures, only decline in verbal fluency had borderline association with decline in acuity (OR=0.0547, p=0.06); the other tests did not predict decline in vision. Conclusions: Cross-sectionally, higher attention is associated with better scores in visual acuity. We hypothesize that the ability to concentrate affects performance in reading the ETDRS chart. While cognition did not appear to be associated with change in acuity, this may be because of the relatively short time period between rounds 3 and 4.

Keywords: memory • visual acuity • aging 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×