May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Reported Visual Impairment and Eye Disease in U.S. Hispanics
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D.M. Jane
    Epidemiology and Public Health, Univeristy of Miami, Miami, FL, United States
  • D.J. Lee
    Epidemiology and Public Health, Univeristy of Miami, Miami, FL, United States
  • B.L. Lam
    Epidemiology and Public Health, Univeristy of Miami, Miami, FL, United States
  • D.D. Zheng
    Epidemiology and Public Health, Univeristy of Miami, Miami, FL, United States
  • O. Gomez-Marin
    Epidemiology and Public Health, Univeristy of Miami, Miami, FL, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D.M. Jane, None; D.J. Lee, None; B.L. Lam, None; D.D. Zheng, None; O. Gomez-Marin, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  1RO3EY13241
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 1270. doi:
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      D.M. Jane, D.J. Lee, B.L. Lam, D.D. Zheng, O. Gomez-Marin; Reported Visual Impairment and Eye Disease in U.S. Hispanics . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):1270.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: There are few comparative studies on the prevalence of visual impairment and eye disease among different Hispanic subgroups residing in the U.S. This study compares the prevalence of visual impairment (VI) and cataract among the major US Hispanic subgroups and compares these rates to those of non-Hispanics. Methods: The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a continuous multistage area probability survey of the US population. Randomly selected NHIS participants were administered questions about VI and selected eye diseases. Complete data were available on 120,735 adults 18 years of age and older who participated in the 1986-1994 NHIS. Hispanic subgroups consisted of 1019 Puerto Ricans, 555 Cuban-Americans, 4830 Mexican-Americans and 3355 "other" Hispanics. The last category consist of those who reported other, multiple, or non-specific Hispanic origin. Statistical methods included logistic regression models with adjustments for covariates as well as survey design. Results: Among Hispanic subgroups, the prevalence of VI was: 4.1% for Puerto Ricans, 1.5% for Cuban American, 2.7% for Mexican Americans, and 3.5% for "other" Hispanics. The highest prevalence of VI was reported by non-Hispanics (4.4%). After adjustment for age and gender, the risk of VI was significantly lower for Cuban-Americans and Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanics; the rate of VI was also significantly higher in Puerto Ricans versus Cuban-Americans. Cuban-Americans reported the highest prevalence of cataract (4.3%), but after adjustment for age and gender differences in prevalence rates relative to non-Hispanics and other Hispanic groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Hispanics residing in the US do not report higher rates of VI and cataract relative to non-Hispanics. Puerto Ricans reported the highest rate of VI among the major Hispanic subgroups.

Keywords: visual acuity • cataract 
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