May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs Inhibit Bacterial Colonization on Soft Contact Lenses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • P.R. Sankaridurg
    Cooperative Research Centre for Eye Research and Technology and Cornea & Contact Lens Res Unit, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • B.M. Bandara
    Cooperative Research Centre for Eye Research and Technology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • M.D. Willcox
    Cooperative Research Centre for Eye Research and Technology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  P.R. Sankaridurg, None; B.M.K. Bandara, None; M.D.P. Willcox, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  American Optometric Foundation- Vistakon Grant 2000
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 1434. doi:
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      P.R. Sankaridurg, B.M. Bandara, M.D. Willcox; Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs Inhibit Bacterial Colonization on Soft Contact Lenses . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):1434.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: It has been shown that some of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) have biofilm inhibiting properties. We investigated the effect of 3 common NSAIDs i.e. Salicylic acid, sodium Diclofenac and Ketorolac trimethamine for their ability to interfere with biofilm formation of range of microorganisms on disposable soft contact lenses. Methods: Two strains each of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Haemophilus influenzae and a strain each of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae were incubated with contact lenses for 1hour for initial adherence (107 cfu/ml in tryptone soya broth (TSB). Pre-colonized contact lenses were then exposed over night to fresh TSB containing varying concentrations of the 3 NSAIDs. The CLs were washed gently with PBS and the colonized bacteria calculated by viable counts on nutrient agar. Results: Complete inhibition of colonization of all microorganisms was demonstrated with salicylic acid (concentration of 150mM for P. aeruginosa, 100mM for S.epidermidis and 50mM for H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae). Ketorolac trimethamine and sodium Diclofenac affected colonization to varying degrees for the various microorganisms. Ketorolac tromethamine: 73% inhibition with 200mM for P. aeruginosa, 100% inhibition with 20mM for H.influenzae, 92% and 100% inhibition with 50mM for S.epidermidis and S.pneumoniae respectively. Sodium diclofenac: 67% and 81% inhibition with 5mg/ml for P. aeruginosa, 51% inhibition with 1mg/ml for S.epidermidis, 99% inhibition with 0.5mg/ml for S.pneumoniae and 97% inhibition with 0.5mg/ml for H.influenzae. Conclusions: NSAIDs can interfere with bacterial colonization on contact lenses. The degree of inhibition of bacterial colonization varies with the type of NSAID and the virulence of strains. Of the compounds tested, Salicylic acid proved to be most effective in inhibiting bacterial colonization.

Keywords: bacterial disease • microbial pathogenesis: experimental studies • contact lens 
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