May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Antibacterial Activity of 4th Generation Fluoroquinolones Against Ocular Pathogens
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R. Ramirez
    Ophthalmology, Univ of Oklahoma Hlth Sci Ctr, Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City, OK, United States
  • H. Jensen
    Ophthalmology Clinical Research, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, United States
  • S. Kane
    Ophthalmology Clinical Research, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, United States
  • D. Cochran
    Ophthalmology Clinical Research, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, United States
  • M.C. Callegan
    Ophthalmology Clinical Research, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  R. Ramirez, None; H. Jensen, Allergan Inc. E; S. Kane, None; D. Cochran, None; M.C. Callegan, Allergan Inc. C.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant EY12985, Research to Prevent Blindness Inc.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 1462. doi:
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      R. Ramirez, H. Jensen, S. Kane, D. Cochran, M.C. Callegan; Antibacterial Activity of 4th Generation Fluoroquinolones Against Ocular Pathogens . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):1462.

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To compare the antibacterial activity of the 4th generation fluoroquinolones gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin against typical ocular pathogens. Methods: Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin were performed in microtiter format in triplicate as per NCCLS guidelines. The following clinical ocular isolates were tested: Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus viridans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Nocardia asteroides, and Mycobacterium chelonae. Results: Gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin exhibited similar activities against the following Gram-positive isolates: S. epidermidis, S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, B. cereus, and E. faecalis. MIC values for these isolates ranged from 0.08 µg/ml to 0.57 µg/ml, and were comparable to previously published values for isolates recovered from systemic infections. The mean MIC of gatifloxacin for S. viridans was 0.22 µg/ml, compared with 0.73 µg/ml for moxifloxacin. The mean MIC of gatifloxacin for P. aeruginosa was 1.28 µg/ml, as compared to 2.60 µg/ml for moxifloxacin. Mean MIC values of gatifloxacin against K. pneumoniae and E. aerogenes were 4- to 6-fold lower than that of moxifloxacin. Both fluoroquinolones achieved similar activities against S. marcescens. Mean MIC values of gatifloxacin against N. asteroides and M. chelonae were 4-fold lower than that of moxifloxacin. Conclusions: Gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin displayed similar activities in vitro against most Gram-positive ocular pathogens and S. marcescens. Compared with that of moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin MIC values were 2-fold lower against P. aeruginosa, 3-fold lower against S. viridans, 4-fold lower against N. asteroides and M. chelonae, and 4- to 6- fold lower against K. pneumoniae and E. aerogenes.

Keywords: antibiotics/antifungals/antiparasitics • bacterial disease • clinical laboratory testing 
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