May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Microbiologic Analysis of Eyes with Retained Intraocular Foreign Bodies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A.J. Terraciano
    Ophthalmology, NY Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, United States
  • D.C. Ritterband
    Ophthalmology, NY Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, United States
  • A. Dingley
    Ophthalmology, NY Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, United States
  • M. Shah
    Ophthalmology, NY Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, United States
  • C. Hsu
    Ophthalmology, NY Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, United States
  • J.A. Seedor
    Ophthalmology, NY Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A.J. Terraciano, None; D.C. Ritterband, None; A. Dingley, None; M. Shah, None; C. Hsu, None; J.A. Seedor, None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 1848. doi:
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      A.J. Terraciano, D.C. Ritterband, A. Dingley, M. Shah, C. Hsu, J.A. Seedor; Microbiologic Analysis of Eyes with Retained Intraocular Foreign Bodies . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):1848.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To evaluate the microbiologic spectrum of intra-ocular foreign body (IOFB) associated endophthlamitis. Methods: The microbiologic and medical records of sixty-one consecutive eyes that presented to The NY Eye and Ear Infirmary with retained intra-ocular foreign bodies between Jan 1999 and July 2002 were reviewed. Results: 61 eyes with intra-ocular foreign bodies underwent surgical intervention. 34 of 61 eyes had intra-ocular cultures performed at the time of surgery. 25 of 34 eyes sampled (74%) had positive intra-ocular cultures and 9 of 34 (26%) had negative cultures. 27 eyes did not have cultures performed at the time of surgery. The most common organisms in descending order were coagulase negative staph (13), Staph aureus (4), B. cereus (3) and P. acnes (2). Conclusions: The organisms responsible for IOFB associated endophthalmitis are similar to those for post-cataract endophthalmitis. B. cereus was the only organism isolated more than once that is uncommon in post cataract endophthalmitis.

Keywords: trauma • bacterial disease • endophthalmitis 
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