May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Antisaccade Performance of Adults and Children: A Dual Task Paradigm
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D.J. Tajik-Parvinchi
    Psychology, CVR York University, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • M.J. Steinbach
    Psychology, CVR York University, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • L. Lillakas
    Psychology, CVR York University, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • E.L. Irving
    Optometry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D.J. Tajik-Parvinchi, None; M.J. Steinbach, None; L. Lillakas, None; E.L. Irving, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NSERC; CRC; Sir Jules Thorn Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 1973. doi:
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      D.J. Tajik-Parvinchi, M.J. Steinbach, L. Lillakas, E.L. Irving; Antisaccade Performance of Adults and Children: A Dual Task Paradigm . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):1973.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: We examined whether pairing an antisaccade task with a secondary task would render adults' performances similar to those of children performing an antisaccade task alone. Methods: We examined the eye movements of 11 adults in 4 different conditions: 1) antisaccade task alone, 2) antisaccade task plus repetition task, 3) antisaccade task plus subtraction task, 4) repeat of antisaccade task alone. This fourth condition was always presented last to examine the effect of practice/learning. We also examined the eye movements of 16 children on the antisaccade task alone. In the antisaccade task, participants were required to make an eye movement towards a dot, if it was green, and to the opposite direction, if it was red. In the antisaccade plus repetition task, adults' performed the antisaccade task while repeating orally presented pairs of numbers. In the antisaccade plus subtraction task, adults' performed the antisaccade task while subtracting orally presented pairs of numbers. Results: 1) the analysis revealed significant differences between the total error rates (both anti and prosaccades error rates) of the children and those of the adults in three conditions: antisaccade alone, repeat of antisaccade alone, and antisaccade plus repetition. There were no significant differences between children's total error rates and adults' when the adults' performed the antisaccade task plus subtraction. 2) Children were faster (had shorter latencies) than adults when correctly executing prosaccades. In order to explore this finding more, we examined the possibility of a speed/accuracy trade off. The analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between correctly executed prosaccades latency duration and antisaccade error rates. 3) Latencies of correctly executed saccades are significantly longer than those of incorrectly executed saccades. 4) The findings suggest that after three practice sessions, adults' antisaccade performance improve. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that subtracting two single digit numbers uses the same resources as those involved in performing an antisaccade task. Adults perform similarly to children, in terms of total error rate, while executing antisaccade eye movements while at the same time carrying out mental subtractions.

Keywords: eye movements: saccades and pursuits • eye movements 
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