May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Interactions between Saccadic and Vergence Eye Movements
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R. Sapir-Pichhadze
    Ophthalmology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • M. Eizenman
    Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • H. Lee
    Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • C.A. Westall
    Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  R. Sapir-Pichhadze, None; M. Eizenman, None; H. Lee, None; C.A. Westall, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  CIHR
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 2131. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      R. Sapir-Pichhadze, M. Eizenman, H. Lee, C.A. Westall; Interactions between Saccadic and Vergence Eye Movements . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):2131.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Step disparity vergence stimuli in children with infantile esotropia result in combined vergence and saccadic responses. To understand the interactions between the saccadic and vergence control systems, responses to simultaneous vergence and saccadic eye movement stimuli were explored. Methods: Four subjects with normal binocular vision participated in the study. Eye movements were recorded by the VISION 2000 binocular eye tracker at a rate of 120 Hz and a resolution of 0.1°. The test stimuli were composed of a fixed central saccadic stimulus seen monocularly and peripheral crossed disparity vergence stimuli consisting of two binocularly seen 10° lines placed at different vertical eccentricities. Results: The probability of generating a saccadic response was affected by the changes in the eccentricity of the disparity vergence stimuli. As the eccentricity of the binocular stimuli increased, the average magnitude and occurrence of pure vergence eye movements decreased and the occurrence of saccades increased. At 0° eccentricity, most of the vergence demand was compensated and no saccades were demonstrated. At an eccentricity of 10°, only 50% of the vergence stimulus was compensated for, and the resultant eye movement consisted of combined vergence and saccadic movements. Conclusions: It has been previously demonstrated that when saccadic and vergence eye movements are preformed simultaneously, vergence is facilitated by both horizontal and vertical saccades. Our results suggest a more complex interaction between the saccadic and vergence control systems as well as a possible inhibitory effect of vergence eye movements on saccadic eye movements.

Keywords: eye movements • vergence • strabismus 
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