May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
The Multifocal Visual Evoked Potential (mfVEP) in a Neuro-Ophthalmology Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J.G. Odel
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York City, NY, United States
  • B.J. Winn
    Psychology, Columbia University, New York City, NY, United States
  • C.S. Chen
    Psychology, Columbia University, New York City, NY, United States
  • J.E. Hong
    Psychology, Columbia University, New York City, NY, United States
  • M.M. Behrens
    Psychology, Columbia University, New York City, NY, United States
  • D.C. Hood
    Psychology, Columbia University, New York City, NY, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J.G. Odel, None; B.J. Winn, None; C.S. Chen, None; J.E. Hong, None; M.M. Behrens, None; D.C. Hood, Zeiss C.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH/NEI grant EY02115
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 2711. doi:
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      J.G. Odel, B.J. Winn, C.S. Chen, J.E. Hong, M.M. Behrens, D.C. Hood; The Multifocal Visual Evoked Potential (mfVEP) in a Neuro-Ophthalmology Practice . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):2711.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To investigate the use of the multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) in a neuro-ophthalmology practice. Methods: Between October, 1998 and October, 2002, 283 mfVEPs were performed on 221 patients referred from a single neuro-ophthalmology practice. Two 7-minute monocular mfVEP recordings were obtained from each eye using equipment and software from EDI. The display, 44.5° in diameter, contained 60 sectors. Each sector was a pattern-reversing checkerboard. Recording electrodes were placed at the inion (I) and I+4 cm, and also at two lateral locations up 1 cm and over 4 cm from I. Monocular and interocular analyses were performed [1,2]. Probability plots, analogous to the probability plots of the Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer (HVF), were used to identify mfVEP abnormalities. Results: Five applications of the mfVEP were identified. The mfVEP was of value in ruling out non-organic disease, diagnosing and following patients with optic neuritis/multiple sclerosis, evaluating patients with unreliable or questionable HVFs, confirming visual field defects, and following optic nerve/ganglion cell disease progression. Conclusions: When combined with static visual fields, the mfVEP is an important tool for the neuro-ophthalmologist. However, in its current form, it is best recorded and interpreted by ophthalmologists and electrophysiologists experienced with the technique. 1. Hood et al (2002) AO. 2. Hood & Greenstein (2003), Prog Ret Eye Res.

Keywords: electrophysiology: clinical • neuro-ophthalmology: optic nerve • neuro-ophthalmology: diagnosis 
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