May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Effects of Diabetes on Frequency Doubling Perimetry
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • L.D. Barber
    Ophthalmology, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, Little Rock, AR, United States
  • M.Q. Lai
    Ophthalmology, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, Little Rock, AR, United States
  • T. Realini
    Ophthalmology, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, Little Rock, AR, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  L.D. Barber, None; M.Q. Lai, None; T. Realini, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 3093. doi:
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      L.D. Barber, M.Q. Lai, T. Realini; Effects of Diabetes on Frequency Doubling Perimetry . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):3093.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To determine if perimetry using frequency doubling technology detects visual field abnormalities in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: A prospective case series of 25 self-reported diabetic patients and 25 self-reported nondiabetic normal controls, all without cataract or glaucoma. Frequency doubling perimetry using the C-20-5 screening mode was performed in one randomly-selected eye of each participant. FDP results were assigned a numerical score between 0 (normal) and 87 (no stimuli detected). Results: Overall, 7/25 (28%) diabetics and 1/25 (4%) normals had an abnormal test; the one normal subject with an abnormal test was subsequently determined to have an abnormal glucose tolerance test and is undergoing further evaluation. Diabetics had higher test scores than normals (8.9 + 16.9 versus 1.0 + 4.4, p=0.028). Diabetics had longer test times than normals (66.4 + 35.5 sec versus 48.3 + 11.2 sec, p=0.019). The longest normal test time was 54 seconds, and the shortest abnormal test time was 78 seconds. Conclusions: Frequency doubling perimetry is abnormal in some patients with diabetes. Test time independent of test score separated 100% of normal and abnormal test results. Diabetes may be a source of "false-positive" test results when using this technology for glaucoma screening. Diabetes must be considered in the work-up of patients with abnormal screening FDP and no explanatory findings on subsequent full ophthalmic examination.

Keywords: diabetes • visual fields • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: sys 
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