May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Attachment of Acanthamoeba to Focus Night & Day (lotrafilcon A) Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Tomlinson
    Department of Vision Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • T.K. Beattie
    Department of Vision Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • D.V. Seal
    Applied Vision Research Centre, City University, London, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A. Tomlinson, Ciba Vision F; T.K. Beattie, None; D.V. Seal, None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 3687. doi:
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      A. Tomlinson, T.K. Beattie, D.V. Seal; Attachment of Acanthamoeba to Focus Night & Day (lotrafilcon A) Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):3687.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To investigate the attachment of Acanthamoeba to commercially available (surface treated) lotrafilcon A contact lenses (Focus Night & Day, Ciba Vision), to the lotrafilcon A lens prior to surface treatment and to the lotrafilcon A lens following a hydrogel coating surface treatment. Attachment is compared to that of the balafilcon A (PureVision, Bausch & Lomb) silicone hydrogel lens and a conventional hydrogel lens (Acuvue, Vistakon). Methods: All lens types were quartered prior to incubation, for 90 minutes, in a suspension of Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites. After incubation and rinsing, the trophozoites attached to one surface of each quarter were counted by direct light microscopy. Sixteen replicates were carried out for each lens type. Logarithmic transformation of the data allowed the use of parametric ANOVA. Results: No significant difference in attachment was detected between the commercially available surface-treated lotrafilcon A lens, the hydrogel coated lens and the balafilcon A lens. But attachment to all three was found to be significantly different from that of both the untreated lotrafilcon A lens and the conventional hydrogel lens (p<0.001), both of which had far fewer organisms attached. Conclusions: Although the mean number of Acanthamoeba attached to the commercially available lotrafilcon A lens (surface treated) was lower than that of the balafilcon A lens, the difference was not found to be significant. Attachment to the untreated lotrafilcon A material is of a similar level to the conventional hydrogel. Both commercial surface treatment and hydrogel coating surface treatment of the lotrafilcon A material induced a significant increase in the level of amoebal attachment compared to the untreated lens. This suggests that for the lotrafilcon A lens amoebal attachment is significantly affected by and can be attributable to the surface treatment process.  

Keywords: contact lens • Acanthamoeba • keratitis 
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