May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
The Correlation Between Light Scattering Intensities in Crystalline Lens and Refraction Change Over Five Years - Reykjavik Eye Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Y. Kawakami
    Department of Endocrinology, The University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK, United States
  • H. Sasaki
    Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa Medical University, Uchinada, Japan
  • F. Jonasson
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland
  • K. Nagai
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland
  • A. Sakamoto
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland
  • N. Takahashi
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland
  • K. Sasaki
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland
  • Reykjavik Eye Study Group
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Y. Kawakami, None; H. Sasaki, None; F. Jonasson, None; K. Nagai, None; A. Sakamoto, None; N. Takahashi, None; K. Sasaki, None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 4464. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Y. Kawakami, H. Sasaki, F. Jonasson, K. Nagai, A. Sakamoto, N. Takahashi, K. Sasaki, Reykjavik Eye Study Group; The Correlation Between Light Scattering Intensities in Crystalline Lens and Refraction Change Over Five Years - Reykjavik Eye Study . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):4464.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the light scattering intensities (LSI) in lens layers and the change in refraction over five years in the Icelandic population. Methods: The 1045 subjects who participated in The Reykjavik Eye Study in 1996 were reexamined 5 years later in 2001. During the 5 years, 87 had died and out of the 958 survivors, 846 or 88% participated. The mean age of the participants was 69.0 years old. Among the 846 participants, 1268 eyes of 680 cases were enrolled in the current study. The subjects with pseudophakic and aphakic eyes and those with anterior subcapsular or cortical opacity in the central optical zone were excluded from this study. Scheimpflug slit and retroillumination photography was taken employing the anterior eye segment analysis system (EAS-1000, NIDEK). LSI in the anterior capsule (A), superficial cortical layer (B), anterior adult nuclear layer (C), anterior fetal nuclear layer (D), central clear interval (E) and posterior fetal nuclear layer (F) were measured respectively. Objective refraction was measured by autorefractometer (ARK-700A NIDEK). The eyes were divided into three groups by refraction change over five years as follows; Myopic group (-1D or less), Emmetropic group(-1D to +1D) and Hyperopic group(+1D or more) . Results: The average change of objective refraction over five years was +0.27±0.72 dioptor (). The changes for different age groups were +0.42 in 50s, +0.28D in 60s, -0.01D in 70s and –0.04D in 80s and over. The LSI in layers A, C, D, E and F at 1996 were significantly higher in the lenses that had developed myopic change than the other two groups. LSI in layer C decreased over five years in the myopic group. No significant difference was seen in the other layers among the three groups. Conclusions: Refraction shifted to the hyperopic side in subjects in their 50s and 60s, and leveled off after age 70s. Eyes with high LSI were at increased risk for myopic change. Myopic change tended to occur when LSI in the anterior adult nuclear layer decreased.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: nat • cataract • refractive error development 
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