May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
LTßR-Ig Treatment Blocks Actively Induced, but not Adoptively Transferred, Uveitis in Lewis Rats
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • H. Shao
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States
  • Y. Fu
    Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States
  • H.J. Kaplan
    Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States
  • D. Sun
    Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  H. Shao, None; Y. Fu, None; H.J. Kaplan, None; D. Sun, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  EY12974
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 4596. doi:
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      H. Shao, Y. Fu, H.J. Kaplan, D. Sun; LTßR-Ig Treatment Blocks Actively Induced, but not Adoptively Transferred, Uveitis in Lewis Rats . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):4596.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Treatment of rodents with a lymphotoxin ß receptor fusion protein (LTßR–Ig), which binds to both LT and LIGHT, prevents the development of autoimmune diseases. In this study, we wanted to explore the potential role of LT or LIGHT in the pathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis. Methods: Uveitis was induced in Lewis rats either by immunization with an uveitogenic peptide, R16, derived from the interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) or by adoptive transfer of R16-specific T cells. The animals were then treated with LTßR-Ig or HVEM-Ig or control Ig. The incidence and severity of uveitis were observed and T cell activation from treated and control-treated immunized rats was determined. Results: LTßR–Ig treatment completely prevented actively induced uveitis, but not the adoptively transferred disease. LTßR–Ig-treated R16-injected rats had a significantly decreased T cell response to R16 and that HVEM-Ig, a fusion protein that blocks LIGHT also inhibited disease development. Conclusion: LIGHT plays an important role in the induction of uveitis and that LTßR–Ig treatment reduces LIGHT activity.

Keywords: autoimmune disease • immunomodulation/immunoregulation • immune tolerance/privilege 
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