May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Ultrastructural Analysis and Characterization of AmbioDryTM Dehydrated Human Amniotic Membrane Allografts
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J.S. Nielsen
    Ophthalmology, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL, United States
  • O.C. John
    Chicago Cornea Research Center, Tinley Park, IL, United States
  • T. John
    Chicago Cornea Research Center, Tinley Park, IL, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J.S. Nielsen, None; O.C. John, None; T. John, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Richard A. Perritt Charitable Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 4672. doi:
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      J.S. Nielsen, O.C. John, T. John; Ultrastructural Analysis and Characterization of AmbioDryTM Dehydrated Human Amniotic Membrane Allografts . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):4672.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: The use of human amniotic membrane (HAM) in anterior segment surgery has gained increasing popularity, and new preparations of HAM continue to be developed. We recently studied a new "free-standing" (without a carrier sheet), deepithelialized, dehydrated HAM and compared it to other types that we have previously reported. Methods: AmbioDryTM dehydrated HAM (n=6) was studied using light (LM), scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. Toluidine blue-stained flat mounts of reconstituted HAM under LM were used to study the deepithelialized surface. The LM specimens were measured 10 times in each of 2 randomly selected fields/specimen to determine the mean rehydrated thickness. Study specimens were reconstituted in sterile balanced salt solution, fixed in 4% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate buffer, and processed for LM, SEM, and TEM. Results: AmbioDryTM HAM samples looked like embossed tissue paper, very light and flexible. Due to the type of mechanical processing, these specimens had a brick-like grid pattern, which on hydration became smooth with partial loss of the grid pattern. The average measured thickness (Table 1.) was 9.41 µm (SD ± 3.61 µm), which is substantially thinner than other previously studied HAM preparations. LM and SEM techniques demonstrated epithelial debris on the basement membrane surface but no intact epithelial cells. The undersurface of the specimens revealed collagen fibrils in a random arrangement. Conclusions: This study is the first ultrastructural characterization of this new HAM preparation. The introduction of this new AmbioDryTM dehydrated HAM adds another dimension to amniotic membrane surgery. The absence of a carrier sheet allows direct ocular application of this new HAM. AmbioDryTM dehydrated HAM without intact epithelial cells and easy handling characteristics make it a good choice for HAM transplantation. Table 1. Mean Rehydrated HAM Thickness Determination in Microns by Light Microscopy  

Keywords: cornea: basic science • transplantation • anterior segment 
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