May 2003
Volume 44, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2003
Parental Education Effects Compliance Following Pediatric Vision Screening in Low and High Income Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J.A. Dunbar
    Ophthalmology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA, United States
  • T. Johnson
    Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, United States
  • S.P. Donahue
    Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  J.A. Dunbar, None; T. Johnson, None; S.P. Donahue, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  CA from RPB; TN Lions Eye Center, LCIF
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2003, Vol.44, 4845. doi:
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      J.A. Dunbar, T. Johnson, S.P. Donahue; Parental Education Effects Compliance Following Pediatric Vision Screening in Low and High Income Children . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2003;44(13):4845.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To study the effect of a telephone education coordinator on compliance with follow-up after pediatric vision screening in low and high-income families. Methods: A statewide preschool photo-screening program targeting children aged 12-48 months was instituted in 1997. Referral for follow-up was communicated by mail until May 18, 1999, after which a coordinator telephoned parents, educating them regarding the risks of strabismus and amblyopia and the importance of follow-up. Demographic data were obtained from Department of Health and US Census data. Compliance results from before and after the coordinator were grouped into quartiles by county median family income ((Q1), (Q2), (Q3), (Q4), from lowest to highest). Results: 14,578 children received vision screening before the coordinator, and 61,037 after. 623 of 970 (64%) referred children were compliant with follow-up care before and 2,145 of 2,671 (80%) after. While families from low-income counties were least compliant before the coordinator (Q1=54%, Q2=61%, Q3=70%, Q4=63%), all quartiles were similar after (Q1=79%, Q2=81%, Q3=80%, Q4=81%). Conclusions: Lack of parental education may be the most important barrier to compliance in both low and high-income families. With education, families from low-income counties showed the largest gains, and achieved similar compliance as those from high-income counties.

Keywords: strabismus: diagnosis and detection • amblyopia • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: tre 
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