December 2002
Volume 43, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   December 2002
Does the Uniocular Drug Trial Predict Second-eye Response to Glaucoma Medications?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • AD Realini
    Ophthalmology University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Little Rock AR
  • RD Fechtner
    Ophthalmology New Jersey Medical School Newark NJ
  • S-PA Atreides
    Ophthalmology University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Little Rock AR
  • S Gollance
    Ophthalmology New Jersey Medical School Newark NJ
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   A.D. Realini, None; R.D. Fechtner, None; S.A. Atreides, None; S. Gollance, None. Grant Identification: Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science December 2002, Vol.43, 281. doi:
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      AD Realini, RD Fechtner, S-PA Atreides, S Gollance; Does the Uniocular Drug Trial Predict Second-eye Response to Glaucoma Medications? . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2002;43(13):281.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To determine if the intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction observed in a uniocular trial correlates with the IOP reduction seen in the fellow eye when the same medication is then administered to the second eye of patients with glaucoma. Methods: 52 glaucoma patients underwent uniocular trials of various glaucoma medications, then subsequently received the same drug in the fellow eye. The IOP reduction observed in the first eye was statistically compared to the IOP reduction observed in the second eye to determine correlation. Results: IOP dropped a mean of 5.7 +/- 3.8 mmHg (mean +/- SD) in the first eye after uniocular trial, and 2.8 +/- 3.3 mmHg in the second eye after bilateral use. Regression analysis demonstrated a poor correlation between first-eye and second-eye response to the same medication (r-squared = 0.0174). To minimize possible contralateral IOP effects of first-eye therapy, a subset of 26 patients treated with latanoprost (which has little if any contralateral IOP effect due to rapid systemic metabolization) was studied, with no improvement in correlation (r-squared = -0.0023). Conclusion: Uniocular trials of glaucoma medications do not predict second-eye IOP response to the same medication. If both eyes of a glaucoma patient require IOP reduction, one should not assume the magnitude of response will be equal in both eyes. The effect of a given medicine must be assessed independently for each eye.

Keywords: 353 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: outcomes/complications • 357 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: treatment/prevention assessment/controlled clinical trials 
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