December 2002
Volume 43, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   December 2002
Impaired Depth Perception: Evidence of Cortical Involvement in Glaucoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • N Gupta
    Glaucoma Unit Ophthalmology Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology
    St Michael's Hospital University of Toronto Toronto ON Canada
  • N Krishnadev
    Glaucoma Unit Ophthalmology Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology
    St Michael's Hospital University of Toronto Toronto ON Canada
  • SJ Hamstra
    Surgery University of Toronto Toronto ON Canada
  • YH Yucel
    Ophthalmology Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology
    St Michael's Hospital University of Toronto Toronto ON Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   N. Gupta, None; N. Krishnadev, None; S.J. Hamstra, None; Y.H. Yucel, None. Grant Identification: Support in part EA Baker CNIB (NG); Glaucoma Research Society of Canada (NG)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science December 2002, Vol.43, 1078. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      N Gupta, N Krishnadev, SJ Hamstra, YH Yucel; Impaired Depth Perception: Evidence of Cortical Involvement in Glaucoma . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2002;43(13):1078.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To determine whether stereoscopic depth perception is affected in glaucoma patients as compared to control subjects. Methods: Stereopsis using a natural test of depth perception was prospectively tested in glaucoma patients of 40 to 65 years (n=37) and in age-matched visual control subjects (n=31), all of whom had a minimum visual acuity of 20/30 in both eyes. Performance was recorded as a stereoacuity threshold. Snellen visual acuity, and interpupillary distance were recorded. The t-test and Mann-Whitney test were used to compare the two groups. Results: The mean stereothreshold was significantly increased in the glaucoma group as compared to the control group (155.00 ± 23.29 arc s vs. 41.94 ± 5.73 arc s; P<0.001). No statistically significant differences in mean age (54.14 ± 1.36 years vs. 52.13 ± 1.56 years; P≷0.3), interpupillary distance (60.43 ± 0.63 mm vs. 61.94 ± 0.51 mm; P≷0.05), or visual acuity (0.812 ± 0.019 vs. 0.861 ± 0.021; P≷0.05) were found between the glaucoma and control groups, respectively. Conclusion: Stereopsis, a binocular function processed no earlier in the visual pathway than visual cortex, is significantly altered in glaucoma patients. This result lends functional evidence of cortical involvement in glaucoma.

Keywords: 329 binocular vision/stereopsis • 621 visual cortex 
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