December 2002
Volume 43, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   December 2002
In Vivo Study of Bacterial Adherence to Five Types of Intraocular Lenses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • L Kodjikian
    Lyon France
    Ophthalmology
  • C Chanlois
    Veterinary
    Lyon France
  • V Bostvironnois
    Veterinary
    Lyon France
  • E Mari
    Veterinary
    Lyon France
  • J Freney
    Microbiology
    Lyon France
  • T Roger
    Veterinary
    Lyon France
  • C Burillon
    Lyon France
    Ophthalmology
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   L. Kodjikian, None; C. Chanlois, None; V. Bostvironnois, None; E. Mari, None; J. Freney, None; T. Roger, None; C. Burillon, None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science December 2002, Vol.43, 1589. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      L Kodjikian, C Chanlois, V Bostvironnois, E Mari, J Freney, T Roger, C Burillon; In Vivo Study of Bacterial Adherence to Five Types of Intraocular Lenses . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2002;43(13):1589.

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine in vivo the adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 14990) to 120 intraocular lenses made of five different biomaterials: fluorine polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), heparinized PMMA, silicone, hydrophobic acrylic and hydrogel. The pig was chosen as an animal model in endophthalmitis, after a bibliographical analysis and a personal study on its aqueous humor composition. Methods: The IOLs, previously infected, were implanted into 90 domestic pigs, after realizing the removal of the crystalline lens under aseptic conditions. The euthanasia of the animals was made at 24 hours, 72 hours and 1 week. The extent of bacterial binding was measured by counting. The results were compared using a two-factors variance analysis. Results: The bound bacteria per area unit were found in increasing order from hydrogel, fluorine PMMA, hydrophobic acrylic, heparinized PMMA, and finally to the silicone polymer. Only the difference between hydrogel and fluorine PMMA was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Bacterial adherence to the implant surface must therefore depend on the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the biomaterial. This classification is similar to those obtained in a previously in vitro study (Burillon et al. 2002).1 Adhesion also depends on the nature of the surrounding medium. This medium is very difficult to modelize considering its complexicity and thus makes in vivo study essential. 1 Burillon C, Kodjikian L, Pellon G, Martra A, Freney J, Renaud FNR. "in-vitro study of bacterial adherence to different types of intraocular lenses" Drug Development and industrial pharmacy. 2002; 28(1): 95-99

Keywords: 316 animal model • 398 endophthalmitis • 339 cell adhesions/cell junctions 
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